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Design and performance of a 24-station high throughput microbioreactor

Authors

  • Peter Harms,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Center for Advanced Sensor Technology, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250; telephone: (410)-455-3400; fax: (410)-455-1049
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  • Yordan Kostov,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Center for Advanced Sensor Technology, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250; telephone: (410)-455-3400; fax: (410)-455-1049
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  • Joseph A. French,

    1. Department of Physics, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Mohammed Soliman,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • M. Anjanappa,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Arun Ram,

    1. Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Govind Rao

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Center for Advanced Sensor Technology, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250; telephone: (410)-455-3400; fax: (410)-455-1049
    • Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Center for Advanced Sensor Technology, University of Maryland at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250; telephone: (410)-455-3400; fax: (410)-455-1049
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Abstract

Two prototype 24-unit microbioreactors are presented and reviewed for their relative merits. The first used a standard 24-well plate as the template, while the second consisted of 24-discrete units. Both systems used non-invasive optical sensors to monitor pH and dissolved oxygen. The systems were used to cultivate Escherichia coli. Both designs had their merits and the results obtained are presented. In addition, dissolved oxygen control was demonstrated at the milliliter scale and 24 simultaneously monitored fermentations were successfully carried out. These results demonstrated high quality high throughput bioprocessing and provide important insights into operational parameters at small scale. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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