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Photodegradation as a mechanism for controlled drug delivery

Authors

  • Donald R. Griffin,

    1. Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California
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  • Joseph T. Patterson,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 410 Westwood Plaza, 5121 Eng V, Los Angeles, California 90095; telephone: +1-310-794-6341; fax: +1-310-794-5956
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  • Andrea M. Kasko

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California
    2. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 410 Westwood Plaza, 5121 Eng V, Los Angeles, California 90095; telephone: +1-310-794-6341; fax: +1-310-794-5956
    • Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 410 Westwood Plaza, 5121 Eng V, Los Angeles, California 90095; telephone: +1-310-794-6341; fax: +1-310-794-5956.
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Abstract

A drug-releasing model compound based on photosensitive acrylated ortho-nitrobenzylether (o-NBE) moiety and fluorescein was synthesized to demonstrate photolysis as a mechanism for drug release. Release of this model compound from a hydrogel network can be controlled with light intensity (5–20 mW/cm2), exposure duration (0–20 min) and wavelength (365, 405, 436 nm). Due to the high molar absorptivity of the compound (5,984 M−1 cm−1), light attenuation is significant in this system. Light attenuation can be used to self-limit the dosing from a hydrogel, and allow subsequent release from the drug reservoir after equilibration, or attenuation can be utilized to create a chemical gradient within the hydrogel. A model of photodegradation that uses an integrated form of Beer–Lambert's law quantitatively predicts release from hydrophilic hydrogels with low crosslink density, but fails to quantitatively predict release from more hydrophobic systems, presumably due to partitioning of the hydrophobic model compound in the hydrogel. In contrast to other mechanisms of release (enzymolysis, hydrolysis), photolysis provides real-time on demand control over drug release along with the unique ability to create chemical gradients within the hydrogel. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2010;107: 1012–1019. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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