Advertisement

Metabolic flux analysis of CHO cell metabolism in the late non-growth phase

Authors

  • Neelanjan Sengupta,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907; telephone: 1-765-494-4088; fax: 1-765-494-0805
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Steven T. Rose,

    1. Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Technology Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John A. Morgan

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907; telephone: 1-765-494-4088; fax: 1-765-494-0805
    • School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907; telephone: 1-765-494-4088; fax: 1-765-494-0805.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures are commonly used for production of recombinant human therapeutic proteins. Often the goal of such a process is to separate the growth phase of the cells, from the non-growth phase where ideally the cells are diverting resources to produce the protein of interest. Characterizing the way that the cells use nutrients in terms of metabolic fluxes as a function of culture conditions can provide a deeper understanding of the cell biology offering guidance for process improvements. To evaluate the fluxes, metabolic flux analysis of the CHO cell culture in the non-growth phase was performed by a combination of steady-state isotopomer balancing and stoichiometric modeling. Analysis of the glycolytic pathway and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) indicated that almost all of the consumed glucose is diverted towards PPP with a high NADPH production; with even recycle from PPP to G6P in some cases. Almost all of the pyruvate produced from glycolysis entered the TCA cycle with little or no lactate production. Comparison of the non-growth phase against previously reported fluxes from growth phase cultures indicated marked differences in the fluxes, in terms of the split between glycolysis and PPP, and also around the pyruvate node. Possible reasons for the high NADPH production are also discussed. Evaluation of the fluxes indicated that the medium strength, carbon dioxide level, and temperature with dissolved oxygen have statistically significant impacts on different nodes of the flux network. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2011; 108:82–92. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary