Topology optimized microbioreactors

Authors

  • Daniel Schäpper,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 229, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark; telephone: +45-2011-5827; fax: +45-4593-2906
    • Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 229, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark; telephone: +45-2011-5827; fax: +45-4593-2906.
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  • Rita Lencastre Fernandes,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 229, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark; telephone: +45-2011-5827; fax: +45-4593-2906
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  • Anna Eliasson Lantz,

    1. Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
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  • Fridolin Okkels,

    1. Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
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  • Henrik Bruus,

    1. Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
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  • Krist V. Gernaey

    1. Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 229, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark; telephone: +45-2011-5827; fax: +45-4593-2906
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Abstract

This article presents the fusion of two hitherto unrelated fields—microbioreactors and topology optimization. The basis for this study is a rectangular microbioreactor with homogeneously distributed immobilized brewers yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that produce a recombinant protein. Topology optimization is then used to change the spatial distribution of cells in the reactor in order to optimize for maximal product flow out of the reactor. This distribution accounts for potentially negative effects of, for example, by-product inhibition. We show that the theoretical improvement in productivity is at least fivefold compared with the homogeneous reactor. The improvements obtained by applying topology optimization are largest where either nutrition is scarce or inhibition effects are pronounced. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2011; 108:786–796. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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