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A novel technique for in situ aggregation of Gluconobacter oxydans using bio-adhesive magnetic nanoparticles

Authors

  • Kefeng Ni,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China; telephone: +86-21-6425-2163; fax: +86-21-6425-0068
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  • Huimin Lu,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China; telephone: +86-21-6425-2163; fax: +86-21-6425-0068
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  • Cunxun Wang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China; telephone: +86-21-6425-2163; fax: +86-21-6425-0068
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  • Kvar C.L. Black,

    1. Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston 60208; telephone: +1-847-467-5273; fax: +1-847-491-4928
    2. Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston 60208
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  • Dongzhi Wei,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China; telephone: +86-21-6425-2163; fax: +86-21-6425-0068
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  • Yuhong Ren,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China; telephone: +86-21-6425-2163; fax: +86-21-6425-0068
    • State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China; telephone: +86-21-6425-2163; fax: +86-21-6425-0068.
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  • Phillip B. Messersmith

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston 60208; telephone: +1-847-467-5273; fax: +1-847-491-4928
    2. Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston 60208
    • Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston 60208; telephone: +1-847-467-5273; fax: +1-847-491-4928.
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  • Kefeng Ni and Huimin Lu contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Here, we present a novel technique to immobilize magnetic particles onto whole Gluconobacter oxydans in situ via a synthetic adhesive biomimetic material inspired by the protein glues of marine mussels. Our approach involves simple coating of a cell adherent polydopamine film onto magnetic nanoparticles, followed by conjugation of the polydopamine-coated nanoparticles to G. oxydans which resulted in cell aggregation. After optimization, 21.3 mg (wet cell weight) G. oxydans per milligram of nanoparticle was aggregated and separated with a magnet. Importantly, the G. oxydan aggregates showed high specific activity and good reusability. The facile approach offers the potential advantages of low cost, easy cell separation, low diffusion resistance, and high efficiency. Furthermore, the approach is a convenient platform technique for magnetization of cells in situ by direct mixing of nanoparticles with a cell suspension. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2012; 109: 2970–2977. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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