Biotechnology and Bioengineering

Cover image for Vol. 110 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 110, Issue 1

Pages C1–C1, fmi–fmvi, 1–352

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Spotlights
    5. Reviews
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. You have free access to this content
      Biotechnology and Bioengineering: Volume 110, Number 1, January 2013 (page C1)

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24789

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover Legend Immunofluorescent staining of human neural progenitor cells on flat surfaces. Cells are counter stained with DAPI to show the neuclei (blue). See related article by Kisaalita et. al., Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Volume 106, Number 4 (1 July 2010), pages 649–659. (Image courtesy of William S. Kisaalita).

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Spotlights
    5. Reviews
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
  3. Spotlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Spotlights
    5. Reviews
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Spotlights
    5. Reviews
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. Review of reactive kinetic models describing reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in soil and groundwater (pages 1–23)

      Julie C. Chambon, Poul L. Bjerg, Charlotte Scheutz, Jacob Bælum, Rasmus Jakobsen and Philip J. Binning

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24714

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reductive dechlorination is a major degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic subsurface environments, and reactive kinetic models describing the degradation process are needed in fate and transport models of these contaminants. In this study, the modeling approaches used to simulate reductive dechlorination and also interactions with fermentation and redox processes, and the experimental data needed to calibrate them are reviewed, classified and discussed.

    2. Critical review of activated sludge modeling: State of process knowledge, modeling concepts, and limitations (pages 24–46)

      H. Hauduc, L. Rieger, A. Oehmen, M.C.M. van Loosdrecht, Y. Comeau, A. Héduit, P.A. Vanrolleghem and S. Gillot

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24624

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The modeling concepts of seven of the most commonly used activated sludge models (ASM1, ASM2d, ASM3, Barker & Dold, UCTPHO+, ASM2d+TU Delft, ASM3+Eawag Bio-P) are reviewed process by process. Based on a short overview of the relevant biochemistry knowledge, the modeled processes are critically compared through a new schematic representation. Theoretical limitations and the main research needed to increase model quality are discussed.

  5. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Spotlights
    5. Reviews
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. Biocatalysis, Protein Engineering, and Nanobiotechnology

      Thermobifida fusca cellulases exhibit limited surface diffusion on bacterial micro-crystalline cellulose (pages 47–56)

      Jose M. Moran-Mirabal, Jacob C. Bolewski and Larry P. Walker

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24604

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This manuscript presents fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single molecule tracking experiments that show that cellulases exhibit limited free surface diffusion over cellulose even at temperatures where catalysis occurs, suggesting that the generalized notion that cellulases can freely diffuse over cellulose surfaces needs revision.

    2. Stable, high-affinity streptavidin monomer for protein labeling and monovalent biotin detection (pages 57–67)

      Kok Hong Lim, Heng Huang, Arnd Pralle and Sheldon Park

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24605

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The obligate tetrameric structure of streptavidin prevents its use in some applications. Lim and coworkers engineered stable and high affinity monomeric streptavidin by introducing rational mutations based on its homolog, rhizavidin. The resulting mSA recognizes biotin as a structural monomer and can be recombinantly fused to other proteins to introduce a biotin binding tag.

    3. Multi-enzymatic one-pot reduction of dehydrocholic acid to 12-keto-ursodeoxycholic acid with whole-cell biocatalysts (pages 68–77)

      Boqiao Sun, Christina Kantzow, Sven Bresch, Kathrin Castiglione and Dirk Weuster-Botz

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24606

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Whole-cell biotransformation strategies for the one-pot two-step reduction of dehydrocholic acid (DCHA) to 12-keto-ursodeoxycholic (12-keto-UDCA) acid were investigated. The authors evaluated approaches, in which single or multiple Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalysts were employed in the one-pot reaction. Furthermore, two widely used enzymes for the regeneration of nicotinamide cofactors, formate dehydrogenase and glucose dehydrogenase, were compared with each other. With the best approach, 100 mM DHCA could be converted to >99.5 mM 12-keto-UDCA within 4.5 h on a liter scale.

    4. Quantitative analysis of enzymatic fractionation of multiple substrate mixtures (pages 78–86)

      Shiva Shanker Kaki and Patrick Adlercreutz

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24613

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enzymatic fractionation of multiple substrate mixtures can be quantitatively analyzed in a way similar to the established methodology used in enantiomer resolution. Based on competitive factors (α1, α2, etc., ratios of specificity constants), useful predictions can be made concerning the outcome of the reactions. Enrichment of erucic acid in mixtures with other fatty acids is used as an example.

    5. Biofuels and Environmental Biotechnology

      Comparison of CO2 and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon sources for triacylglycerol and starch accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (pages 87–96)

      Robert D. Gardner, Egan Lohman, Robin Gerlach, Keith E. Cooksey and Brent M. Peyton

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24592

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Investigations into the carbon storage characteristics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high or low inorganic carbon concentrations, and speciation between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, during nitrogen deplete culturing are described.

    6. The microalga Parachlorella kessleri––A novel highly efficient lipid producer (pages 97–107)

      Xiuling Li, Pavel Přibyl, Kateřina Bišová, Shigeyuki Kawano, Vladislav Cepák, Vilém Zachleder, Mária Čížková, Irena Brányiková and Milada Vítová

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24595

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Limitation with any macroelement or depletion of mineral medium stimulated lipid overproduction in the alga Parachlorella kessleri. The strategy for industrial application consists of the fast growth of culture grown in the complete medium to produce sufficient biomass (DW more than 10 g/L) followed by the dilution of nutrient medium to stop growth and cell division by limitation of all elements, leading to induction of lipid production and accumulation up to 60% DW.

    7. Observing and modeling BMCC degradation by commercial cellulase cocktails with fluorescently labeled Trichoderma reseii Cel7A through confocal microscopy (pages 108–117)

      Jeremy S. Luterbacher, Larry P. Walker and Jose M. Moran-Mirabal

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24597

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Understanding the kinetics of depolymerization of cellulosic materials is key in optimizing industrial saccharification processes. In this study, the degradation of crystalline cellulose fibrils by a commercial cellulase cocktail was observed over time through confocal fluorescence microscopy. Kinetic models developed to fit to the microscopy data accurately predicted the soluble sugar concentrations liberated in bulk hydrolysis experiments. The authors' analysis revealed that exposing new binding sites on the cellulose fibril surface is a rate-limiting step for hydrolysis.

    8. Outdoor cultivation of temperature-tolerant Chlorella sorokiniana in a column photobioreactor under low power-input (pages 118–126)

      Quentin Béchet, Raul Muñoz, Andy Shilton and Benoit Guieysse

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24603

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microalagae Chlorella sorokiniana was grown outdoors under low power input for mixing and without temperature control. Despite these far from ideal conditions, the measured photosynthetic efficiency was relatively high compared with other studies (PE = 4.8% of the solar energy reaching the algae was converted as biomass). This determination was however found to be particularly sensitive to the value of the atmospheric diffusion coefficient.

    9. A pore-hindered diffusion and reaction model can help explain the importance of pore size distribution in enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass (pages 127–136)

      Jeremy S. Luterbacher, Jean-Yves Parlange and Larry P. Walker

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24614

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A key, and often overlooked, role of biomass pretreatment is to increase the accessibility of the material to cell-wall-degrading-enzymes (CWDEs) such as cellulases. This accessibility is essential to expanding reactive surface areas for enzyme binding and subsequent hydrolysis and it is likely to affect the fraction of pore volume available for CWDEs to act synergistically. Thus, our accessibility model analyzes this contribution and is important for our understanding of how CWDEs interact with pretreated biomass.

    10. Simultaneous clostridial fermentation, lipase-catalyzed esterification, and ester extraction to enrich diesel with butyl butyrate (pages 137–142)

      Corjan van den Berg, Arjan S. Heeres, Luuk A. M. van der Wielen and Adrie J. J. Straathof

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24618

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The recovery of 1-butanol from fermentation broth is energy-intensive since typical concentrations in fermentation broth are below 20 g L−1. To prevent butanol inhibition and high downstream processing costs, the authors aimed at producing butyl esters instead of 1-butanol. It is shown that it is possible to perform simultaneously clostridial fermentation, esterification of the formed butanol to butyl butyrate, and extraction of this ester by hexadecane.

    11. Algal swimming velocities signal fatty acid accumulation (pages 143–152)

      Travis J. Hansen, Miki Hondzo, Mara T. Mashek, Douglas G. Mashek and Paul A. Lefebvre

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24619

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Micro-algal swimming speed signals culture health and total fatty acid accumulation. Instantaneous and in situ swimming velocities of biodiesel producing algae were measured.

    12. Evaluating four mathematical models for nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (pages 153–163)

      Bing-Jie Ni, Zhiguo Yuan, Kartik Chandran, Peter A. Vanrolleghem and Sudhir Murthy

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24620

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reaction schemes used in the four N2O models evaluated in this study—(A) Model I: AOB denitrification pathway with NH2OH as the electron donor; (B) Model II: AOB denitrification pathway with NH3 as the electron donor; (C) Model III: the NH2OH/NOH pathway; and (D) Model IV: the NH2OH/NO pathway. Schematics adapted from Stein (2011a) and Chandran et al. (2011).

    13. Interactions between Clostridium beijerinckii and Geobacter metallireducens in co-culture fermentation with anthrahydroquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AH2QDS) for enhanced biohydrogen production from xylose (pages 164–172)

      Xinyu Zhang, Xiaofeng Ye, Kevin T. Finneran, Julie L. Zilles and Eberhard Morgenroth

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24627

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper established a co-culture with extracellular electron shuttle (AH2QDS) fermentation system to improve biohydrogen production from xylose. Zhang and coworkers demonstrate interactions between C. beijerinckii and G. metallireducens in the presence of AH2QDS, resulting in significant increased hydrogen production and substrate utilization. This co-culture fermentation allows biological in situ regeneration of the AH2QDS that can enhance biohydrogen production through metabolic pathway shift and reduces accumulation of acetate during xylose fermentation, providing a novel strategy to improve biohydrogen production.

    14. Photoautotrophic cathodic oxygen reduction catalyzed by a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (pages 173–179)

      Xian-Wei Liu, Xue-Fei Sun, Yu-Xi Huang, Dao-Bo Li, Raymond J. Zeng, Lu Xiong, Guo-Ping Sheng, Wen-Wei Li, Yuan-Yuan Cheng, Shu-Guang Wang and Han-Qing Yu

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24628

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, could directly mediate oxygen reduction without artificial redox mediator addition.

    15. Bioprocess Engineering and Supporting Technologies

      Comparison of two methods for designing calorimeters using stirred tank reactors (pages 180–190)

      Lars Regestein, Heiner Giese, Michael Zavrel and Jochen Büchs

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24601

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To monitor the biological heat generation in a pilot-scale stirred tank, different reactor designs and modifications are generally conceivable. One approach is based on the determination of the heat transfer coefficient of the reactor system, another one requires the measurement of the mass flow rate of the cooling water. The recalculated biological heat generations based on these two methods were compared and validated by monitoring an Escherichia coli fermentation with an exhaust gas analysis.

    16. Automated dynamic fed-batch process and media optimization for high productivity cell culture process development (pages 191–205)

      Franklin Lu, Poh Choo Toh, Iain Burnett, Feng Li, Terry Hudson, Ashraf Amanullah and Jincai Li

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24602

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nutrient feeding of mammalian cell culture can be automated through advancement of in-line sampling and on-line probes to dynamically alter feed rates during the culture. These dynamic feeds can improve productivity and accelerate the pace of early stage process developments.

    17. Fed-batch and perfusion culture processes: Economic, environmental, and operational feasibility under uncertainty (pages 206–219)

      James Pollock, Sa V. Ho and Suzanne S. Farid

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24608

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper evaluates the current and future potential of batch and continuous cell culture technologies via a case study based on the commercial manufacture of monoclonal antibodies. The case study compares fed-batch culture to two perfusion technologies: spin-filter perfusion and an emerging perfusion technology utilizing alternating tangential flow (ATF) perfusion. The strategies were compared across a range of scales and titres so as to visualize how their ranking changes in different industry scenarios.

    18. Beyond growth rate 0.6: Corynebacterium glutamicum cultivated in highly diluted environments (pages 220–228)

      Alexander Grünberger, Jan van Ooyen, Nicole Paczia, Peter Rohe, Georg Schiendzielorz, Lothar Eggeling, Wolfgang Wiechert, Dietrich Kohlheyer and Stephan Noack

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24616

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Growth of C. glutamicum on defined glucose media was compared at different scales covering batch cultivations in the liter range down to single cell cultivations in the picoliter range. The highest growth rate of equation image was obtained in a microfluidic perfusion system enabling a constant micro-environment. These results prove that higher growth rates of C. glutamicum than known from typical batch cultivations are possible, and that growth is definitely impaired by very low concentrations of byproducts such as acetate.

    19. Bioseparations and Downstream Processing

      Impact of virus preparation quality on parvovirus filter performance (pages 229–239)

      Ashley Slocum, Mike Burnham, Paul Genest, Adith Venkiteshwaran, Dayue Chen and Joseph Hughes

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24600

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors describe excellent performance of a highly purified virus spike, the Ultra 3 parvovirus, on the Viresolve® Pro filter for virus removal processes. The Ultra 3 demonstrates consistently low contaminants with high monodispersal status, and minimal flux decay with 3 different MABs and a polyclonal protein, even when challenged up to 5% spikes. High level spikes could deliver up 8 to 9 logs of virus removed from this processing step that is so critical for most biologics' purification.

    20. The dynamics of the CHO host cell protein profile during clarification and protein A capture in a platform antibody purification process (pages 240–251)

      Catherine E.M. Hogwood, Andrew S. Tait, Nadejda Koloteva-Levine, Daniel G. Bracewell and C. Mark Smales

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24607

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A proteomics analysis approach (2D-PAGE) has revealed that subsequent downstream processing choices following the harvest of the cell culture supernatant from Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing a model monoclonal antibody impacts upon the host cell protein (HCP) profile. We utilized an ultra scale down approach which could be used in early process development to aid the design/selection of clarification techniques to minimize HCP content and/or to screen potential cell lines to select those with overall reduced HCP profiles or of those HCPs which are problematic and challenging to remove.

    21. Host cell protein quantification by fourier transform mid infrared spectroscopy (FT-MIR) (pages 252–259)

      Florian Capito, Romas Skudas, Harald Kolmar and Bernd Stanislawski

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper describes the quantification of host cell proteins in mammalian cell culture, using attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (ATR). With the help of this non-invasive, cost-effective and fast analysis technique, quantification of host cell protein titers between 20,000 and 200,000 ng ml−1 was possible. First results show the potential of ATR to replace existing quantification techniques, however, require further investigations.

    22. Cellular and Metabolic Engineering

      Functional heterogeneity and heritability in CHO cell populations (pages 260–274)

      Sarah L. Davies, Clare S. Lovelady, Rhian K. Grainger, Andrew J. Racher, Robert J. Young and David C. James

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24621

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study reveals that despite the inherent genetic instability of CHO cells in functionally heterogeneous parental populations, it is practically possible to exploit this intrinsic variability to obtain clonal derivatives that exhibit heritable differences in key functional attributes that can impact biomanufacturing processes. Davies and coworkers demonstrate that clonal derivatives can be obtained with a rapid biomass accumulation phenotype that performs better than the functionally heterogeneous donor parental cell population.

    23. Functional assembly and characterization of a modular xylanosome for hemicellulose hydrolysis in yeast (pages 275–285)

      Sneha Srikrishnan, Wilfred Chen and Nancy A. Da Silva

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24609

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Five modular xylanosomes displaying three fungal enzymes were assembled on the yeast cell surface for the synergistic saccharification of xylan. The synergy due to enzyme-enzyme and enzyme–substrate proximity, and the effects of binding domain choice and position on hydrolysis were determined. The xylanosome with a binding domain from Thermotoga maritima improved hydrolysis by 3.3-fold over free enzymes. Swapping the xylan binding module position within the scaffoldin increased hydrolysis 1.5-fold when the binding domain was adjacent to the endoxylanase.

    24. Engineering Science of Biological Systems

      Combined treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms with bacteriophages and chlorine (pages 286–295)

      Yanyan Zhang and Zhiqiang Hu

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24630

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A combination treatment of phages and chlorine (d) resulted in biofilms with the lowest cell density and viability compared to the groups of control (a), chlorine (b) and phage treatment (c) alone.

    25. Tissue Engineering and Delivery Systems

      Arginine functionalization of hydrogels for heparin binding—a supramolecular approach to developing a pro-angiogenic biomaterial (pages 296–317)

      Louisa Gilmore, Stephen Rimmer, Sally L. McArthur, Shweta Mittar, Dachau Sun and Sheila MacNeil

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24598

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Development of a pro-angiogenic biomaterial for wound healing and tissue engineering applications is described. Poly(NVP-co-DeGBAC-co-AA) (PNDA) was functionalized with trilysine or triarginine peptides and then used to achieve non-covalent binding of heparin which was then used to bind and release bioactive VEGF. Proliferation of endothelial cells was significantly increased by tri-arginine functionalized hydrogels loaded with heparin and VEGF. Non-covalent interactions between these hydrogels and heparin offer the prospect of these hydrogels being used to bind endogenous heparin in clinical situations.

    26. Three-dimensional nanocharacterization of porous hydrogel with ion and electron beams (pages 318–326)

      Aswan Al-Abboodi, Jing Fu, Pauline M. Doran and Peggy P.Y. Chan

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24612

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability to image three-dimensional (3D) cell growth is crucial for understanding and studying various cellular activities in a 3D context, particularly for designing new tissue engineering scaffolds. The authors demonstrate using focused ion beam (FIB) milling, electron imaging, and associated microanalysis techniques such that novel 3D characterizations can be performed effectively on cells growing inside a 3D hydrogel scaffold. With FIB-tomography, the porous microstructures were revealed at nanometer resolution, with the cells grown inside.

    27. Modulation of cell attachment and collagen production of anterior cruciate ligament cells via submicron grooves/ridges structures with different cell affinity (pages 327–337)

      Peng-Yuan Wang, Tsung-Han Wu, Pen-Hsiu Grace Chao, Wei-Hsuan Kuo, Meng-Jiy Wang, Cheng-Che Hsu and Wei-Bor Tsai

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24615

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells were harvested from porcine knee and cultured on the grooved surfaces with various feature sizes and surface chemistries. Cell alignment is feature size-dependent, while type I collagen production is both feature size- and surface chemistry-dependent on the grooved surfaces. This study demonstrates that grooved topography accompanied by favorable surface chemistry facilitates ACL tissue engineering.

  6. Communications to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Spotlights
    5. Reviews
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. Cellular and Metabolic Engineering

      A genetic and metabolic approach to redirection of biochemical pathways of Clostridium butyricum for enhancing hydrogen production (pages 338–342)

      Guiqin Cai, Bo Jin, Paul Monis and Christopher Saint

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24596

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hydrogen production yield has been enhanced by approximately 20% via redirection of metabolic pathways.

    2. Development of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for increasing the accumulation of triacylglycerol as a microbial oil feedstock for biodiesel production using glycerol as a substrate (pages 343–347)

      Kyung Ok Yu, Ju Jung, Ahmad Bazli Ramzi, Se Hoon Choe, Seung Wook Kim, Chulhwan Park and Sung Ok Han

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24623

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aim of this study is to present the accumulation of microbial oil for biodiesel feedstock from low cost feedstock. The authors demonstrated the overproduction of TAG from glycerol in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae via the glycerol-3-phosphate pathway by overexpressing the major TAG synthesis. The content of TAG in the engineered strain yielded 8.2% TAG, representing a 2.3-fold improvement compared to the wild-type strain. The results should allow a reduction of costs and a more sustainable production of biodiesel.

    3. Systems Biotechnology

      On-demand killing of adherent cells on photo-acid-generating culture substrates (pages 348–352)

      Kimio Sumaru, Kyoko Kikuchi, Toshiyuki Takagi, Manae Yamaguchi, Taku Satoh, Kana Morishita and Toshiyuki Kanamori

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.24617

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Novel method to kill adherent cells as cultured on a substrate by micro-projection of mild visible light was developed by means of culture substrates functionalized with photo-acid-generating polymer. Patterned killing and in situ screening of CHO-K1 cells were demonstrated by using a PC-controlled micro-pattern projection system. Further, photo-selective killing after photo-induced patterning of CHO-K1 cells was achieved on a substrate.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION