Biotechnology and Bioengineering

Cover image for Vol. 111 Issue 5

May 2014

Volume 111, Issue 5

Pages C1–C1, fmi–fmv, vi–vi, 849–1058

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Features
    5. Mini Review
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Features
    5. Mini Review
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Features

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Features
    5. Mini Review
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. Spotlight

      You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
    3. You have free access to this content
    4. You have free access to this content
  4. Mini Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Features
    5. Mini Review
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Systems metabolic engineering design: Fatty acid production as an emerging case study (pages 849–857)

      Ting Wei Tee, Anupam Chowdhury, Costas D. Maranas and Jacqueline V. Shanks

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Systems Metabolic Engineering integrates the field of classical metabolic engineering, system biology, synthetic biology and evolutionary engineering. In this review, the authors explore recent advances in developing high yielding medium-chain fatty acid producing E. coli strains as an emerging case study for Systems Metabolic Engineering design.

  5. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Features
    5. Mini Review
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. Biocatalysis, Protein Engineering, and Nanobiotechnology

      Biogenic tellurium nanorods as a novel antivirulence agent inhibiting pyoverdine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (pages 858–865)

      Anee Mohanty, Mustafa Hussain Kathawala, Jianhua Zhang, Wei Ning Chen, Joachim Say Chye Loo, Staffan Kjelleberg, Liang Yang and Bin Cao

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Extracellular tellurium nanorods (TeNRs) produced by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis could effectively inhibit the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, one of the most important virulence factors, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The TeNRs (up to 100 mg/l) do not exhibit cytotoxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells and murine macrophages. Thus, biogenic TeNRs hold promise as a novel antivirulence agent against P. aeruginosa.

    2. Biofuels and Environmental Biotechnology

      Model-based estimation of optimal temperature profile during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Arundo donax (pages 866–875)

      Sarma Mutturi and Gunnar Lidén

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this present work a model derived non-isothermal process was developed, which improved the ethanol yield and productivity during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated Arundo donax.

    3. Bioprocess Engineering and Supporting Technologies

      Rate-limiting step analysis of the microbial desulfurization of dibenzothiophene in a model oil system (pages 876–884)

      Andres Abin-Fuentes, James C. Leung, Magdy El-Said Mohamed, Daniel I.C. Wang and Kristala L.J. Prather

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25148

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mechanistic analysis of the microbial desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) by Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 in a model biphasic (oil-water), small-scale system was performed. The analysis took into account the biocatalyst's distribution into three populations: free cells in the aqueous phase, cell aggregates and oil-adhered cells. The diffusion of dibenzothiophene within the biocatalyst aggregates was identified as the overall rate-limiting step in the process.

    4. Computational fluid model incorporating liver metabolic activities in perfusion bioreactor (pages 885–895)

      Myat Noe Hsu, Guo-Dong Sean Tan, Marshella Tania, Erik Birgersson and Hwa Liang Leo

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Quantitative analysis of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell culture in a perfusion bioreactor was described using a two-dimensional computational model. The authors have incorporated the effects of fluid-induced cell surface shear stress and oxygen mass transport into various cellular metabolic functions, and obtained a good agreement between the experimental data and numerical simulations. Thus, the model could form a basis for making rational design choices for future works on bioreactors.

    5. Semisynthetic model calibration for monitoring glucose in mammalian cell culture with in situ near infrared spectroscopy (pages 896–903)

      Michael Milligan, Nicholas Lewin-Koh, Daniel Coleman, Adeyma Arroyo and Victor Saucedo

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper demonstrates the method to build a single Near Infrared (NIR) calibration model that can be used across different cell culture media and cell lines. This method is demonstrated by measuring glucose in CHO bioreactors in real-time with an In-situ probe.

    6. Bioseparations and Downstream Processing

      Identification and characterization of host cell protein product-associated impurities in monoclonal antibody bioprocessing (pages 904–912)

      Nicholas E. Levy, Kristin N. Valente, Leila H. Choe, Kelvin H. Lee and Abraham M. Lenhoff

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This work identifies and characterizes host cell protein (HCP) product-associated impurities, that is, HCP species carried through the downstream purification processes via direct interactions with the monoclonal antibody (mAb) product. Interactions between HCPs and mAbs are characterized using cross-interaction chromatography under solution conditions typical of those used in downstream processing. The interacting species are then identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ultra scale-down characterization of the impact of conditioning methods for harvested cell broths on clarification by continuous centrifugation—Recovery of domain antibodies from rec E. coli (pages 913–924)

      Alex Chatel, Peter Kumpalume and Mike Hoare

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultra scale-down techniques were used to study the processing of rec E. coli broths expressing a domain antibody. The upper line shows the whole distribution while the lower line focuses on the fine end. The impact of flocculation is to precipitate soluble contaminants and to remove particles at the fine end. Most crucially for effective centrifugal recovery, the effect of exposure to high shear stress does not lead to the reappearance of the fine and difficult to recover particles.

    8. A new mixed-mode model for interpreting and predicting protein elution during isoelectric chromatofocusing (pages 925–936)

      Derek Y.C. Choy, A. Louise Creagh, Eric von Lieres and Charles Haynes

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25166

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fundamental studies are used to derive a new model to understand and predict elution of proteins during anion-exchange chromatofocusing by accounting for isoelectric focusing, ion binding and exchange, and surface pH contributions to protein retention and elution band broadening.

    9. Engineering Science of Biological Systems

      Microfluidic perfusion culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells under fully defined culture conditions (pages 937–947)

      Ryosuke Yoshimitsu, Koji Hattori, Shinji Sugiura, Yuki Kondo, Rotaro Yamada, Saoko Tachikawa, Taku Satoh, Akira Kurisaki, Kiyoshi Ohnuma, Makoto Asashima and Toshiyuki Kanamori

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25150

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Human iPS cells (hiPSCs) are a promising source for drug discovery, although there are two potential problems: 1) instability of culture conditions caused by conventional culture plates, and 2) distortion of screening results due to undefined culture conditions. Yoshimitsu and coworkers have demonstrated that undifferentiated and differentiated states and the proliferation of hiPSCs can be controlled by a microfluidic perfusion system with fully defined culture conditions. Their system will be a platform technology for future large-scale screenings using hiPSCs.

    10. Quantitative control of intracellular signaling activity through chimeric receptors incorporating multiple identical tyrosine motifs (pages 948–955)

      Koichiro Saka, Masahiro Kawahara and Teruyuki Nagamune

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors constructed scFv/receptor chimeras incorporating multiple STAT3 binding motifs at the different positions in the intracellular domain. The results indicated the chimeric receptors can quantitatively control the activation levels of STAT3 with an extended dynamic range, depending on ligand concentration and the number of motifs. Our approach could achieve the efficient control over the fates of cells that are expected to be applied to tissue engineering, including pluripotent stem cells.

    11. Systems Biotechnology

      Growth, photosynthetic efficiency, and biochemical composition of Tetraselmis suecica F&M-M33 grown with LEDs of different colors (pages 956–964)

      Fabian Abiusi, Giacomo Sampietro, Giovanni Marturano, Natascia Biondi, Liliana Rodolfi, Massimo D'Ottavio and Mario R. Tredici

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Besides differences in biomass productivity and photosynthetic efficiency, differences in cell size were observed in the cultures held under red, white, blue and green lights, which reflected differences in the cell cycle. Under red light cells were more motile and the cell size was nearly half that of the cells grown under white light and about 75% that of the cells grown under blue or green light.

    12. Cellular responses to individual amino-acid depletion in antibody-expressing and parental CHO cell lines (pages 965–979)

      Dina Fomina-Yadlin, John J. Gosink, Rebecca McCoy, Brian Follstad, Arvia Morris, Chris B. Russell and Jeffrey T. McGrew

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors' findings indicate that (1) Amino-acid response (AAR) pathway is intact and functional in CHO cells, that (2) nonessential amino acids, specifically asparagine and glutamine, induce AAR and impact ATF4 signaling in parental and antibody-expressing CHO cell lines examined, and that (3) stimulation of the AAR pathway by nonessential amino acids leads to growth suppression via induction of G1 cell cycle arrest.

    13. Dynamic transcriptional response of Escherichia coli to inclusion body formation (pages 980–999)

      Faraz Baig, Lawrence P. Fernando, Mary Alice Salazar, Rhonda R. Powell, Terri F. Bruce and Sarah W. Harcum

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inclusion body (IB) formation in E. coli triggers increased gene expression levels for protein and energy synthesis genes, and streamlines transport and catabolic process genes, in addition to increased heat-shock response gene expression levels. E. coli cultured in ethanol; however, do not alter these same gene expression levels, yet still produce IBs. Additionally, for the ethanol-cultured cells, the IBs have higher florescent signal, indicative of greater soluble protein.

    14. Tissue Engineering and Delivery Systems

    15. Co-regulation of primary mouse hepatocyte viability and function by oxygen and matrix (pages 1018–1027)

      Lorenna D. Buck, S. Walker Inman, Ivan Rusyn and Linda G. Griffith

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25152

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Complementary approaches were used to vary the oxygen concentration in the local pericellular microenvironment of primary cultured C57/bl mouse hepatocytes in systematic fashion, and the oxygen concentrations as a function of time in culture were measured directly using a newly-developed oxygen microprobe system and related to hepatocellular function. Cell viability was compromised only at the lowest oxygen concentrations and albumin secretion rates were greatest at supraphysiological oxygen concentrations.

    16. Controlled local presentation of matrix proteins in microparticle–laden cell aggregates (pages 1028–1037)

      Abigail B. Bernard, Rebeccah Z. Chapman and Kristi S. Anseth

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25153

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      (A) Unpolymerized macromer solution (gray) was photopolymerized through a chromephotomask to create hydrogel microwell arrays (B). (CE) Cell–microparticle aggregates were formed by (C) incubating MIN6 β-cells (green) with protein-laden particles (red) overnight to facilitate cell–protein interactions and promote more uniform distribution. (D) Cells and microparticles were then seeded into hydrogel microwell arrays (gray) using centrifugation and orbital shaking. (E) After 5 days of static culture, cell–microparticle aggregates were removed from the microwell devices for imaging. Image not to scale.

    17. Scaffold-free formation of a millimeter-scale multicellular spheroid with an internal cavity from magnetically levitated 3T3 cells that ingested iron oxide-containing microspheres (pages 1038–1047)

      Joon Ho Lee and Won Hur

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A millimeter-scale multicellular structure was formed by magnetic levitation of 3T3 cells that had ingested Fe3O4-containing microcapsules. Hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained section and surgical dissection showed that the spheroid had a hollow interior filled with a fluid-state cell suspension. Thus, it was shown that that magnetically levitated 3T3 cells organized themselves into a tissue-like spheroid, resulting in core cell death.

  6. Communications to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Contents
    4. Features
    5. Mini Review
    6. Articles
    7. Communications to the Editor
    1. Cellular and Metabolic Engineering

      Seamless correction of the sickle cell disease mutation of the HBB gene in human induced pluripotent stem cells using TALENs (pages 1048–1053)

      Ning Sun and Huimin Zhao

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By using an engineered TALEN and piggyBac transposon, the authors successfully corrected the sickle cell disease mutation of the HBB gene in patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells in a specific and seamless manner. This study demonstrates an important first step of using TALENs for the treatment of genetic diseases, which represents a significant advance toward stem cell and gene therapies.

    2. Biocatalysis, Protein Engineering, and Nanobiotechnology

      In situ mixed donor synthesis of ampicillin with ethylene glycol co-solvent (pages 1054–1058)

      Andria L. Deaguero and Andreas S. Bommarius

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bit.25143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ethylene glycol enhances ampicillin yield in kinetically controlled beta-lactam antibiotics synthesis by partially transesterifying phenylglycine methyl ester and acting as a mixed in-situ donor system. While synthesis rates are decreased in ethylene glycol-containing solvents, primary and secondary hydrolysis side reactions of phenylglycine methyl ester, but not of the corresponding amide, are suppressed more strongly.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION