Get access

Systematic review and meta-analysis of steatosis as a risk factor in major hepatic resection

Authors

  • V. E. de Meijer,

    1. Department of Surgery and the Vascular Biology Program, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    2. Department of Hepatobiliary and Transplantation Surgery, Erasmus MC—University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • B. T. Kalish,

    1. Department of Surgery and the Vascular Biology Program, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. Puder,

    1. Department of Surgery and the Vascular Biology Program, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. N. M. IJzermans

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Hepatobiliary and Transplantation Surgery, Erasmus MC—University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    • PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background:

The risk of major hepatic resection in patients with hepatic steatosis remains controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to establish the best estimate of the impact of steatosis on patient outcome following major hepatic surgery.

Methods:

A systematic search was performed following Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Risk ratios (RRs) for complication and mortality rates were calculated for patients with no, less than 30 per cent and at least 30 per cent steatosis, and a meta-analysis was carried out.

Results:

Of six observational studies identified, four including a total of 1000 patients were subjected to meta-analysis; two others were tabulated separately. Compared with patients without steatosis, those with less than 30 per cent and at least 30 per cent steatosis had a significantly increased risk of postoperative complications, with a RR of 1·53 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 1·27 to 1·85) and 2·01 (1·66 to 2·44) respectively. Patients with at least 30 per cent steatosis had an increased risk of postoperative death (RR 2·79, 95 per cent c.i. 1·19 to 6·51).

Conclusion:

Patients with steatosis had an up to twofold increased risk of postoperative complications, and those with excessive steatosis had an almost threefold increased risk of death. Copyright © 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ancillary