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Outcomes following prosthetic patch repair in newborns with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

Authors

  • W. B. Jawaid,

    1. Academic Paediatric Surgery Unit, Division of Women's and Children's Health, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    2. Department of Paediatric Surgery, Alder Hey Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
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  • E. Qasem,

    1. Department of Paediatric Surgery, Alder Hey Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
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  • M. O. Jones,

    1. Department of Paediatric Surgery, Alder Hey Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
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  • N. J. Shaw,

    1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Alder Hey Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
    2. Liverpool Women's Hospital, Liverpool, UK
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  • P. D. Losty

    Corresponding author
    1. Academic Paediatric Surgery Unit, Division of Women's and Children's Health, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    2. Department of Paediatric Surgery, Alder Hey Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK
    • Correspondence to: Professor P. D. Losty, Academic Paediatric Surgery Unit, Alder Hey Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L12 2AP, UK (e-mail: paul.losty@liverpool.ac.uk)

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Abstract

Background

The anatomical defect in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can usually be closed primarily but prosthetic patch repair may be required in newborns with a deficient diaphragm. High rates of patch failure and hernia recurrence (up to 50 per cent) have been reported. This study evaluated contemporary outcomes following patch repair of CDH at a UK paediatric surgical centre.

Methods

Medical records of newborns undergoing surgery for CDH between 1 February 1990 and 1 November 2010, and attending a multidisciplinary follow-up clinic, were examined. Operative details and patch utilization are reported.

Results

Of 118 newborns with CDH, 37 required a patch to the diaphragmatic defect. Gore-Tex® patches were used in 35 and biological Surgisis® patches in two. Eight babies additionally required an abdominal wall patch. Seven infants had an abdominal patch alone with primary diaphragm repair. A total of 102 infants (86·4 per cent) survived after surgery. Two early recurrences were both related to the use of biological patches, leading to revisional surgery with Gore-Tex® patch reconstruction. Diaphragmatic patch use was associated with a greater requirement for intensive cardiovascular and respiratory support, although there was no significant difference in mortality between patch versus primary diaphragm repair. The mortality rate was significantly higher among infants requiring abdominal wall patching (with or without a diaphragmatic patch): 40 per cent (6 of 15) versus 9·7 per cent (10 of 103) (P = 0·006). Postoperative survival rates for infants with a diaphragmatic patch alone, abdominal wall patch alone, and both abdominal and diaphragmatic patches were 86 per cent (25 of 29), 57 per cent (4 of 7) and 63 per cent (5 of 8) respectively.

Conclusion

Prosthetic diaphragmatic hernia repair at this centre has a good outcome and low rate of recurrence (5 per cent). The recognition of an inadequate abdominal domain prenatally may additionally prove to be a useful marker for predicting increased mortality in newborns with CDH.

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