Bringing the excitement and motivation of research to students; Using inquiry and research-based learning in a year-long biochemistry laboratory

Part I–guided inquiry–purification and characterization of a fusion protein: Histidine tag, malate dehydrogenase, and green fluorescent protein.

Authors

  • Kristopher Knutson,

    1. Department of Chemistry and the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Program, Minnesota State University Moorhead, Minnesota, Minnesota 56563
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  • Jennifer Smith,

    1. Department of Chemistry and the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Program, Minnesota State University Moorhead, Minnesota, Minnesota 56563
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  • Mark A. Wallert,

    1. Department of Chemistry and the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Program, Minnesota State University Moorhead, Minnesota, Minnesota 56563
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  • Joseph J. Provost

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Program, Minnesota State University Moorhead, Minnesota, Minnesota 56563
    • Department of Chemistry and the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Program, Minnesota State University Moorhead, Minnesota, Minnesota 56563
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    • Tel: (218) 477-5085; Fax: (218) 477-2018.


Abstract

A successful laboratory experience provides the foundation for student success, creating active participation in the learning process. Here, we describe a new approach that emphasizes research, inquiry and problem solving in a year-long biochemistry experience. The first semester centers on the purification, characterization, and analysis of a novel fusion protein within a guided research experience. Throughout the semester, students gradually acquire skills as they are allowed to work independently. A fusion protein, malate dehydrogenase-green fluorescent protein with a histidine affinity tag (MGH), is used throughout the semester. The fusion protein allows for a high throughput analysis and is stable for duration of the semester. Students start with the purification and analysis of the plasmid DNA and end with an enzymatic analysis of MGH. As students take ownership of their experiments and choose two different chromatographic resins, they make many choices throughout the semester. Skills, motivation, confidence levels, and attitudes were assessed before and after the semester. Students achieved high levels of critical biochemical laboratory skills and critical thinking while increasing their confidence and motivation for working in a biochemical research setting.

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