Identification of disulfide bridges in a cardiotoxic peptide by electrospray ionization

Authors

  • Thaiya Krishnamurthy,

    Corresponding author
    1. Dept of the Army, US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command, US Army Edgewood Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423, USA
    • Dept of the Army, US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command, US Army Edgewood Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423, USA
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  • Charles R. Hauer,

    1. Dept of the Army, US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command, US Army Edgewood Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Wadsworth Center for Laboratories Research, New York State of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509, USA
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  • M. Prabhakaran,

    1. Dept of the Army, US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command, US Army Edgewood Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423, USA
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  • James G. Freedy,

    1. Dept of the Army, US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command, US Army Edgewood Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423, USA
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  • Kyozo Hayashi

    1. Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 502, Japan
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Abstract

A new method was developed for subjecting a peptide to a specified number of Edman degradation cycles on an automated polypeptide sequencer and desorbing the residual peptide for further investigations. The procedure was applied in combination with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify the four disulfide bridges present in a small tightly bound peptide. The task was accomplished using only a few nanomoles of the intact peptide.

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