The origin and ion spectra of non-covalent peptide dimers observed in liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry explained via first-order gas-phase kinetics

Authors

  • John B. Cunniff,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Barnett Institute, Northeastern University, 102 Hurtig Hall, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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  • Paul Vouros,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Barnett Institute, Northeastern University, 102 Hurtig Hall, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    • Department of Chemistry and Barnett Institute, Northeastern University, 102 Hurtig Hall, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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  • Dave L. Kaplan,

    1. Biotechnology Branch, US Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center, Natick, MA 01760-5020, USA
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  • Steve A. Fossey

    1. Biotechnology Branch, US Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center, Natick, MA 01760-5020, USA
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Abstract

Static liquid secondary ion mass spectra were generated for a variety of dipeptides dissolved in common liquid secondary ion mass spectrometric matrices. The relationship of the ion intensities of the monomer and non-covalent dimers was examined in order to determine the origin of non-covalent dimerization. The results demonstrate that the ion intensities are independent of solution equilibria and are indicative of first-order gas-phase kinetics.

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