You have full text access to this Open Access content

Brain and Behavior

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 6

November 2012

Volume 2, Issue 6

Pages i–i, 707–843

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (page i)

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.108

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Cellular basis for singing motor pattern generation in the field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer) (pages 707–725)

      Stefan Schöneich and Berthold Hedwig

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.89

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crickets use species-specific song patterns for acoustic communication. The singing behavior is based on a genetically fixed motor rhythm driven by a central pattern generator circuit in the central nervous system (CNS). We anatomically identified and physiologically characterized individual interneurons of the singing network in the Mediterranean field cricket. The results also disclosed functional mechanisms underlying the rhythm generation and provide a starting point for comparative studies of the song pattern generator circuits in cricket species that produce very different song patterns.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      BDNF Val66Met polymorphism interacts with sex to influence bimanual motor control in healthy humans (pages 726–731)

      Ruud Smolders, Mark Rijpkema, Barbara Franke and Guillén Fernández

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.83

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The BDNF val66met SNP has been associated with both structural and functional changes in the brain but also with behavioral effects in motor learning. Here we report for the first time an interaction between BDNF val66met and sex in the motor domain.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Overexpression of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase reduces MeCP2 and HDAC2 expression (pages 732–740)

      Elodie Deschatrettes, Peggy Jouvert and Jean Zwiller

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.92

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The present report shows that activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase by local application of 8-bromo-cGMP in the caudate–putamen reduced the expression of the epigenetic markers, methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) , in dopaminergic projection areas. We also studied the effect of PKG overexpression by injecting a plasmid vector containing the human PKG-Iα cDNA in either the ventral tegmental area or the caudate–putamen. Data suggest that the cGMP pathway affects cognitive processes through a mechanism that comprises the MeCP2/HDAC2 complex and the subsequent control of gene silencing.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of motivation on reward and attentional networks: an fMRI study (pages 741–753)

      Iliyan Ivanov, Xun Liu, Suzanne Clerkin, Kurt Schulz, Karl Friston, Jeffrey H. Newcorn and Jin Fan

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.80

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Motivation and effortful control interact to produce behavioral changes, but the precise nature of these interactions remains unclear. Our results suggest that rewards that are interpreted as “easy” may be associated with greater cognitive effort to maximize profit in a money-winning paradigm.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Age- and disease-related features of task-related brain oscillations by using mutual information (pages 754–762)

      Chia-Ju Liu, Chin-Fei Huang, Chia-Yi Chou, Wen-jin Kuo, Yu-Te Lin, Chao-Ming Hung, Tsung-Ching Chen and Ming-Chung Ho

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.93

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aim of this study was to investigate changes in task-related brain oscillations and corticocortical connections in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and those with normal aging using cross-mutual information (CMI) analysis.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Two critical periods in early visual cortex during figure–ground segregation (pages 763–777)

      Martijn E. Wokke, Ilja G. Sligte, H. Steven Scholte and Victor A. F. Lamme

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.91

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We studied the necessity of early visual cortex during different stages of visual perception. We therefore disrupted activity in V1/V2 with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at different time intervals while concurrently recording EEG signals. Results show that early visual cortex is not only essential in an early stage of vision when figure borders are detected, but subsequently contribute to more sophisticated stages of visual perception.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The functional epistasis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met on emotion processing: a preliminary study (pages 778–788)

      Tim Outhred, Pritha Das, Carol Dobson-Stone, Kristi Griffiths, Kim L. Felmingham, Richard A. Bryant, Gin Malhi and Andrew H. Kemp

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.99

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This fMRI study contributes novel and preliminary findings relating to a functional epistasis of the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met genes on emotion processing. The effect of the BDNF Met66 allele was dependent on 5-HTTLPR alleles, such that participants with S and Met alleles had the greatest rostral anterior cingulate and amygdala activation during the presentation of emotional images relative to other genetic groupings.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The effects of linguistic relationships among paired associates on verbal self-generation and recognition memory (pages 789–795)

      Miriam Siegel, Jane B. Allendorfer, Christopher J. Lindsell, Jennifer Vannest and Jerzy P. Szaflarski

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.98

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We show that self-generated information is better remembered than passively read information using a cued-recall task. This advantage was mediated by using opposite, synonym, category, and association word-pair relationships while rhyming relationships did not extend such an advantage.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Theta event-related synchronization is a biomarker for a morbid effect of alcoholism on the brain that may partially resolve with extended abstinence (pages 796–805)

      Casey S. Gilmore and George Fein

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.95

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Long-term abstinent alcoholics (LTAA) have shown stronger event-related synchronization (ERS) in the theta-frequency band to target stimuli compared with nonalcoholic controls. Alcoholics who have been abstinent for only a short period of time show a significantly greater magnitude increase in theta ERS compared with controls than do LTAA, with no concomitant differences in alcohol use severity or family history of alcohol problems. Results suggest that increased theta ERS is a biomarker for a detrimental effect of alcohol abuse on the brain that may recover, at least partially, with extended abstinence.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The effects of MAOA genotype, childhood trauma, and sex on trait and state-dependent aggression (pages 806–813)

      Floor E. A. Verhoeven, Linda Booij, Anne-Wil Kruijt, Hilâl Cerit, Niki Antypa and Willem Van der Does

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.96

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study shows that women with the high-expression variant of the MAOA gene report more aggressive thoughts and behaviors in relation to sad mood compared with women with the low-expression variant. This effect is not observed in men, nor were there any gene by environment interactions. A protective effect of the lower expression variant in women is consistent with previous observations in adolescent girls, and suggests that the higher MAOA expression variant may predispose to aggression-related problems during depressive episodes.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Open label, randomized, crossover pilot trial of high-resolution, relational, resonance-based, electroencephalic mirroring to relieve insomnia (pages 814–824)

      Charles H. Tegeler, Sandhya R. Kumar, Dave Conklin, Sung W. Lee, Lee Gerdes, Dana P. Turner, Catherine L. Tegeler, Brian C. Fidali and Tim T. Houle

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This was a randomized, unblinded, wait-list, cross over study of HIRREM plus usual care (HUC) versus usual care alone (UC), for subjects with insomnia, with a primary outcome of pre- to post-HIRREM Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) scores. Results for differential change in ISI: −10.3 (95% CI: −13.7 to −6.9), P < 0.0001, with standardized effect size of 2.68, and effects also persisted for > 4 weeks after completion of the HIRREM intervention.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Functional near-infrared spectroscopy for the assessment of overt reading (pages 825–837)

      Dima Safi, Maryse Lassonde, Dang Khoa Nguyen, Phetsamone Vannasing, Julie Tremblay, Olivia Florea, Olivier Morin-Moncet, Mélanie Lefrançois and Renée Béland

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.100

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aim of this study was to design and validate a protocol using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) for the assessment of overt reading of irregular words and nonwords. All participants showed significant activations for both irregular word and nonword reading (compared with baseline) in the inferior frontal gyri, the middle and superior temporal gyri, and the occipital cortices bilaterally. Results also revealed the implication of the bilateral inferior frontal gyri in the grapheme-to-phoneme conversion characterizing the phonological pathway of reading as higher [HbT] values were found in nonword than in irregular word reading. Our findings thus confirmed that fNIRS is an appropriate technique to assess the neural correlates of overt reading.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Isolated CNS Whipple disease with normal brain MRI and false-positive CSF 14-3-3 protein: a case report and review of the literature (pages 838–843)

      Victor W. Sung, Michael J. Lyerly, Kenneth B. Fallon and Khurram Bashir

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.97

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Isolated CNS WD, while rare, is important to recognize as it may be treatable and when missed can be fatal. We review the literature regarding isolated CNS WD and use our case to illustrate that the suspicion for isolated CNS WD should remain high even in the absence of commonly described features such as abnormal hyperintense lesions on MRI. Our case also had a false-positive CSF 14-3-3 protein, and therefore, isolated CNS WD should be considered in those cases as well.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION