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Brain and Behavior

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 3

May 2013

Volume 3, Issue 3

Pages i–ii, 207–328

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Review
    5. Corrigenda
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.144

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Review
    5. Corrigenda
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Thoracic venous congestion caused by thoracic disc herniation (pages 207–210)

      Eric P. Roger, Andrea J. Chamczuk and Marygrace C. Hagan

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.127

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      We present what is to our knowledge the first reported case of thoracic disc herniation leading to venous congestive myelopathy (VCM), which was clinically and radiographically suggestive of Foix–Alajouanine syndrome (angiodysgenetic necrotizing myelopathy). In addition, we review current concepts in evaluating the etiology of VCM and discuss indications for surgery.

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      Do not throw out the baby with the bath water: choosing an effective baseline for a functional localizer of speech processing (pages 211–222)

      Nadav Stoppelman, Tamar Harpaz and Michal Ben-Shachar

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.129

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      We compare functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to speech against two commonly used baselines: Reversed speech and signal correlated noise (SCN). The results show that Reversed Speech removes much of the speech responses in frontal and temporal areas, while SCN maintains these responses and only removes those in primary auditory cortex. We further show that the response to reversed speech in left inferior frontal gyrus decays significantly faster than the response to speech, suggesting that this response reflects bottom up activation of speech analysis processes followed up by top-down attenuation once the signal is classified as non-speech.

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      Social behavior is perturbed in mice after exposure to bisphenol A: a novel assessment employing an IntelliCage (pages 223–228)

      Hiroshi Ogi, Kyoko Itoh and Shinji Fushiki

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.130

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      (1) The mice behavior exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) from E0 until P21 was analyzed using IntelliCage; (2) BPA-exposed females visited the drinking corner less frequently during light cycle; (3) BPA-exposed males stayed longer at the specific corner with a stronger preference; (4) Following preceding animals, the visit interval was shorter in BPA-exposed males; (5) BPA affects motivational behavior in social setting differently in males and females.

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      Group independent component analysis of MR spectra (pages 229–242)

      Ravi Kalyanam, David Boutte, Chuck Gasparovic, Kent E. Hutchison and Vince D. Calhoun

      Version of Record online: 13 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.131

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      This study investigates the potential of independent component analysis (ICA) to provide a data driven approach for group level analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) spectra. A comparative evaluation of the ICA and LCModel methods in analyzing noise- and artifacts-free simulated data sets of known compositions and single voxel in vivo spectra from multiple subjects is presented. The results provide evidence that ICA is a promising technique for decomposing MR spectral data into components resembling metabolite resonances, and therefore has the potential to provide a data-driven alternative to the use of metabolite concentrations, in making group comparisons.

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      Crucifixion and median neuropathy (pages 243–248)

      Jacqueline M. Regan, Kiarash Shahlaie and Joseph C. Watson

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.132

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      An aspect of the torture of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist.

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      Dopamine-transporter levels drive striatal responses to apomorphine in Parkinson's disease (pages 249–262)

      Luca Passamonti, Maria Salsone, Nicola Toschi, Antonio Cerasa, Marco Giannelli, Carmelina Chiriaco, Giuseppe Lucio Cascini, Francesco Fera and Aldo Quattrone

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.115

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      We studied how dopamine-transporter (DAT) levels influenced brain responses to apomorphine, a potent dopamine agonist, in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients executing a working-memory task. We found an inverted-U-shaped relation between DAT levels and striatal response to apomorphine and interpreted these findings as reflecting changes in striatal D2-receptor sensitivity. In future, multimodal brain markers may be useful for personalizing drug therapy in PD.

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      Assessing temporal processing of facial emotion perception with transcranial magnetic stimulation (pages 263–272)

      Yuri Rassovsky, Junghee Lee, Poorang Nori, Allan D. Wu, Marco Iacoboni, Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Gerhard Hellemann and Michael F. Green

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.136

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      This project was an effort to understand how the speed of facial emotion processing varies as a function of spatial frequency composition of facial stimuli. Results indicate that although low spatial frequency information is generally more important than high spatial frequency (HSF) information for emotional processing, both low and HSF filtering reduced the speed of extracting emotional information from faces. It appears that intact faces rely primarily on fast feedforward mechanisms for emotional processing, whereas filtered faces can no longer effectively process emotional information without re entrant feedback from higher areas of the brain.

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      A balancing act of the brain: activations and deactivations driven by cognitive load (pages 273–285)

      Marie Arsalidou, Juan Pascual-Leone, Janice Johnson, Drew Morris and Margot J. Taylor

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.128

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      Graded difficulty changes modulate brain responses to competing systems. Working memory and default-mode processes show an inverse, linear relation in the brain. Activation patterns show region-specific roles of prefrontal and posterior areas.

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      Neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological approaches to postictal antinociception-related prosencephalic neurons: the role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors (pages 286–301)

      Renato Leonardo de Freitas, Luana Iacovelo Bolognesi, André Twardowschy, Fernando Morgan Aguiar Corrêa, Nicola R. Sibson and Norberto Cysne Coimbra

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.105

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      (1) Dorsal hippocampus receives inputs from cortical areas, raphe nuclei, and locus coeruleus; (2) Synaptic blockade in dorsal hippocampus decreased postictal analgesia; (3) Muscarinic and nicotinic receptors of dorsal hippocampus modulate postictal analgesia.

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Review
    5. Corrigenda
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      How cigarette smoking may increase the risk of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders: a critical review of biological pathways (pages 302–326)

      Steven Moylan, Felice N. Jacka, Julie A. Pasco and Michael Berk

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.137

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      This review explores the biological pathways which may influence the development of pathological anxiety and how these pathways may also be affected by cigarette smoking.

  4. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Review
    5. Corrigenda
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Social exclusion, infant behavior, social isolation, and maternal expectations independently predict maternal depressive symptoms (page 327)

      John E. D. Eastwood, Bin Jalaludin, Lynn Kemp, Hai Phung, Bryanne A. M. Barnett and Jacinta Tobin

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.140

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      Early presymptomatic cholinergic dysfunction in a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (page 328)

      Caty Casas, Mireia Herrando-Grabulosa, Raquel Manzano, Renzo Mancuso, Rosario Osta and Xavier Navarro

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.141

      This article corrects:

      Early presymptomatic cholinergic dysfunction in a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

      Vol. 3, Issue 2, 145–158, Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2013

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