Physiological description of multivariate interdependencies between process parameters, morphology and physiology during fed-batch penicillin production

Authors

  • Andreas E. Posch,

    1. Christian Doppler Laboratory for Mechanistic and Physiological Methods for Improved Bioprocesses, Research Area Biochemical Engineering, Inst. of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria
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  • Christoph Herwig

    Corresponding author
    1. Christian Doppler Laboratory for Mechanistic and Physiological Methods for Improved Bioprocesses, Research Area Biochemical Engineering, Inst. of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria
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Abstract

Optimization of productivity and economics of industrial bioprocesses requires characterization of interdependencies between process parameters and process performance. In the case of penicillin production, as in other processes, process performance is often closely interlinked with the physiology and morphology of the organism used for production. This study presents a systematic approach to efficiently characterize the physiological effects of multivariate interdependencies between bioprocess design parameters (spore inoculum concentration, pO2 control level and substrate feed rate), morphology, and physiology. Method development and application was performed using the industrial model process of penicillin production. Applying traditional, statistical bioprocess analysis, multivariate correlations of raw bioprocess design parameters (high spore inoculum concentration, low pO2 control as well as reduced glucose feeding) and pellet morphology were identified. A major drawback of raw design parameter correlation models; however, is the lack of transferability across different process scales and regimes. In this context, morphological and physiological bioprocess modeling based on scalable physiological parameters is introduced. In this study, raw parameter effects on pellet morphology were efficiently summarized by the physiological parameter of the biomass yield per substrate. Finally, for the first time to our knowledge, the specific growth rate per spore was described as time-independent determinant for switching from pellet to disperse growth during penicillin production and thus introduced as a novel, scalable key process parameter for pellet morphology and process performance. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 30:689–699, 2014

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