Survey of clinicians' attitudes to the anatomical teaching and knowledge of medical students

Authors

  • S.W. Waterston,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Medical Sciences (Anatomy), College of Life Science and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Marischal College, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom
    • School of Medical Sciences (Anatomy), College of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Marischal College, Broad Street, Aberdeen, AB10 1YS, Scotland, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • I.J. Stewart

    1. School of Medical Sciences (Anatomy), College of Life Science and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Marischal College, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

There is considerable and ongoing debate surrounding the teaching of anatomy to medical students, and the anatomical knowledge of those medical students once they graduate. Few attempts have been made to gather the opinions of clinicians on this subject. A questionnaire was sent to 362 senior clinicians in hospitals affiliated to the University of Aberdeen. A total of 162 replies were received, with this sample being representative of the population of hospital consultants. Our results indicate that the majority of clinicians feel that the current anatomical education of medical students is inadequate, and below the minimum necessary for safe medical practice. There is widespread support among clinicians for more vertical integration of anatomy teaching throughout the undergraduate curriculum. Clin. Anat. 18:380–384, 2005. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary