Advance organizers in a gross anatomy dissection course and their effects on academic achievement

Authors

  • Eun-Kyung Chung,

    1. Department of Medical Education, Chonnam National University Medical School, The Brain Korea 21 Project, Center for Biomedical Human Resources at Chonnam National University, Gwangju, South Korea
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    • Eun-Kyung Chung and Kwang-Il Nam contributed equally to this work.

  • Kwang-Il Nam,

    1. Department of Anatomy, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, South Korea
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    • Eun-Kyung Chung and Kwang-Il Nam contributed equally to this work.

  • Sun-A Oh,

    1. Center for Teaching and Learning, Gwangju University, Gwangju, South Korea
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  • Eui-Ryoung Han,

    Corresponding author
    1. Office of Education and Research, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, South Korea
    • Office of Education and Research, Chonnam National University Hospital, Jebong-ro 42, Dong-gu, Gwangju, 501-757, South Korea
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  • Young-Jong Woo,

    1. Department of Medical Education, Chonnam National University Medical School, The Brain Korea 21 Project, Center for Biomedical Human Resources at Chonnam National University, Gwangju, South Korea
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  • Maurice A. Hitchcock

    1. Division of Medical Education, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
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Abstract

We presented two kinds of advance organizers (AOs), video clips and prosection, for a gross anatomy dissection course and compared their effects on academic achievement and student perception of the learning experience. In total, 141 students at Chonnam National University Medical School were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 (n = 70) was provided with video clips AO, whereas Group 2 (n = 71) was provided with prosection AO, the use of cadaveric specimens dissected by the course instructor. Student self-assessment scores regarding the learning objectives of upper limb anatomy improved significantly in both groups. Academic achievement scores in Group 2 were significantly higher than those in Group 1, although the self-assessment scores were not significantly different between the groups. Additionally, students in Group 2 responded significantly more positively to the statements about perception of the learning experience such as helping them understand the course content and concepts, decreasing anxiety about the dissection course, and participating actively in the dissection. It would seem that the application of prosection as an AO improved academic achievement and increased student engagement and satisfaction. This study will contribute to designing effective AOs and developing a teaching and learning strategy for a gross anatomy dissection course. Clin. Anat. 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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