Physical therapy management of female chronic pelvic pain: Anatomic considerations

Authors

  • Susan E. George,

    1. Centers for Rehabilitation Services, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susan C. Clinton,

    1. Centers for Rehabilitation Services, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Diane F. Borello-France

    Corresponding author
    1. Centers for Rehabilitation Services, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Physical Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Department of Physical Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The multisystem nature of female chronic pelvic pain (CPP) makes this condition a challenge for physical therapists and other health care providers to manage. This article uses a case scenario to illustrate commonly reported somatic, visceral, and neurologic symptoms and their associated health and participation impact in a female with CPP. Differential diagnosis of pain generators requires an in-depth understanding of possible anatomic and physiologic contributors to this disorder. This article provides a detailed discussion of the relevant clinical anatomy with specific attention to complex interrelationships between anatomic structures potentially leading to the patient's pain. In addition, it describes the physical therapy management specific to this case, including examination, differential diagnosis, and progression of interventions. Clin. Anat. 26:77–88, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary