Classic versus millennial medical lab anatomy

Authors

  • Brion Benninger,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medical Anatomical Sciences, Western University of Health Sciences, COMP–Northwest, Lebanon, Oregon
    2. Department of Neuromuscular Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, COMP–Northwest, Lebanon, Oregon
    3. Department of Family Practice, Western University of Health Sciences, COMP–Northwest, Lebanon, Oregon
    4. College of Dental Medicine, Pomona, California
    5. Department of Orthopaedics, Samaritan Health Services, Corvallis, Oregon
    6. Department of General Surgery, Samaritan Health Services, Corvallis, Oregon
    7. Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
    8. Department of Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
    9. Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
    • Correspondence to: Brion Benninger, Oregon Health and Science University, Oregon, USA. E-mail: benninge@ohsu.edu

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  • Nik Matsler,

    1. Department of Medical Anatomical Sciences, Western University of Health Sciences, COMP–Northwest, Lebanon, Oregon
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  • Taylor Delamarter

    1. Department of Medical Anatomical Sciences, Western University of Health Sciences, COMP–Northwest, Lebanon, Oregon
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Abstract

This study investigated the integration, implementation, and use of cadaver dissection, hospital radiology modalities, surgical tools, and AV technology during a 12-week contemporary anatomy course suggesting a millennial laboratory. The teaching of anatomy has undergone the greatest fluctuation of any of the basic sciences during the past 100 years in order to make room for the meteoric rise in molecular sciences. Classically, anatomy consisted of a 2-year methodical, horizontal, anatomy course; anatomy has now morphed into a 12-week accelerated course in a vertical curriculum, at most institutions. Surface and radiological anatomy is the language for all clinicians regardless of specialty. The objective of this study was to investigate whether integration of full-body dissection anatomy and modern hospital technology, during the anatomy laboratory, could be accomplished in a 12-week anatomy course. Literature search was conducted on anatomy text, journals, and websites regarding contemporary hospital technology integrating multiple image mediums of 37 embalmed cadavers, surgical suite tools and technology, and audio/visual technology. Surgical and radiology professionals were contracted to teach during the anatomy laboratory. Literature search revealed no contemporary studies integrating full-body dissection with hospital technology and behavior. About 37 cadavers were successfully imaged with roentograms, CT, and MRI scans. Students were in favor of the dynamic laboratory consisting of multiple activity sessions occurring simultaneously. Objectively, examination scores proved to be a positive outcome and, subjectively, feedback from students was overwhelmingly positive. Despite the surging molecular based sciences consuming much of the curricula, full-body dissection anatomy is irreplaceable regarding both surface and architectural, radiological anatomy. Radiology should not be a small adjunct to understand full-body dissection, but rather, full-body dissection aids the understanding of radiology mediums. The millennial anatomy dissection laboratory should consist of, at least, 50% radiology integration during full-body dissection. This pilot study is an example of the most comprehensive integration of full-body dissection, radiology, and hospital technology. Clin. Anat. 27:988–993, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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