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Cancer Medicine

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 3

December 2012

Volume 1, Issue 3

Pages i–ii, 289–371

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.52

  2. Cancer Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. Original Research

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      Identification of multiple subclones in peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified with genomic aberrations (pages 289–294)

      Noriaki Yoshida, Akira Umino, Fang Liu, Kotaro Arita, Kennosuke Karube, Shinobu Tsuzuki, Koichi Ohshima and Masao Seto

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.34

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      A model of clonal evolution in PTCL, NOS. The original tumor cell grows and accumulates genetic aberrations during clonal evolution as indicated by the arrows.

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      Nisin, an apoptogenic bacteriocin and food preservative, attenuates HNSCC tumorigenesis via CHAC1 (pages 295–305)

      Nam E. Joo, Kathryn Ritchie, Pachiyappan Kamarajan, Di Miao and Yvonne L. Kapila

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.35

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      Nisin decreases HNSCC tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo by inducing increased cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation; effects that are mediated by activation of CHAC1, increased calcium influxes, and induction of cell cycle arrest. These findings support the use of nisin as a potentially novel therapeutic for HNSCC, and as nisin is safe for human consumption and currently used in food preservation, its translation into a clinical setting may be facilitated.

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      Modulation of CXCL-8 expression in human melanoma cells regulates tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis (pages 306–317)

      Sheng Wu, Seema Singh, Michelle L. Varney, Scott Kindle and Rakesh K. Singh

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.28

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      CXCL-8 is a direct determinant of aggressive melanoma phenotypes, including tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and targeting CXCL-8 produced by tumor cells and the supporting stroma is a direction for studying this pathway to develop future melanoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

  3. Clinical Cancer Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. Original Research

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      Effectiveness of aromatase inhibitors and tamoxifen in reducing subsequent breast cancer (pages 318–327)

      Reina Haque, Syed A. Ahmed, Alice Fisher, Chantal C. Avila, Jiaxiao Shi, Amy Guo, T. Craig Cheetham and Joanne E. Schottinger

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.37

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      Women who take aromatase inhibitors (AIs) alone or following tamoxifen treatment have subsequent breast cancer rates similar to women treated exclusively with tamoxifen even after accounting for adherence.

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      Individual transcriptional activity of estrogen receptors in primary breast cancer and its clinical significance (pages 328–337)

      Tatsuyuki Gohno, Yuko Seino, Toru Hanamura, Toshifumi Niwa, Mitsuyo Matsumoto, Nobuo Yaegashi, Hanako Oba, Masafumi Kurosumi, Hiroyuki Takei, Yuri Yamaguchi and Shin-ichi Hayashi

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.41

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      We established a novel method for analyzing ERE transcriptional activity in clinical specimens, and observed varying ERE activity and drug sensitivity in individual samples. Notably, ER protein expression and ERE transcriptional activity were not always correlated. Our method could help analysis of individual cases and their likely response to hormone-based therapy.

  4. Cancer Prevention

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. Original Research

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Considerations in setting up and conducting epidemiologic studies of cancer in middle- and low-income countries: the experience of a case–control study of inflammatory breast cancer in North Africa in the past 10 years (pages 338–349)

      Amr S. Soliman and Catherine Schairer

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.36

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      This article illustrates crucial issues in setting up and conducting epidemiologic studies on cancer in North Africa. The questions we had to ask in order to address these issues might be helpful to others in setting up epidemiologic studies in developing regions. Our experience could improve time and cost efficiency of future epidemiologic studies in this or other regions in low- and middle-income countries.

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      Urban–rural disparities in colorectal cancer screening: cross-sectional analysis of 1998–2005 data from the Centers for Disease Control's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Study (pages 350–356)

      Allison M. Cole, J. Elizabeth Jackson and Mark Doescher

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.40

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      Colorectal cancer screening is effective, yet underused. Rural residents may face increased barriers to screening compared with urban residents. We describe significant urban–rural colorectal cancer screening disparities in the United States.

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      Association of diabetes and perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer (pages 357–362)

      Ibrahim Halil Sahin, Mohamed A. Shama, Motofumi Tanaka, James L. Abbruzzese, Steven A. Curley, Manal Hassan and Donghui Li

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.43

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      We observed that diabetic patients with pancreatic cancer had a significantly higher frequency of perineural invasion and a lower frequency of abdominal pain than nondiabetic patients. Diabetes and perineural invasion were independently associated with reduced survival and increased risk of death. These findings support the hypothesis that diabetes may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression via the mechanism of nerve damage.

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      Measuring colorectal cancer care quality for the publicly insured in New York State (pages 363–371)

      Amber H. Sinclair, Maria J. Schymura, Francis P. Boscoe, Rachel L. Yung, Kun Chen, Patrick Roohan, Eric Tai and Deborah Schrag

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.30

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      Linked cancer registry, Medicaid and Medicare claims and hospital discharge data were used to evaluate adherence with colorectal cancer care quality metrics in publicly insured cancer patients in New York. The results show that there is room for improvement in well-accepted care quality metrics, notably for older patients.

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