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Cancer Medicine

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 1

February 2013

Volume 2, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–115

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Meeting Report
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.63

  2. Cancer Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Meeting Report
    1. Original Research

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Overexpression of DRAM enhances p53-dependent apoptosis (pages 1–10)

      Masahiro Takahashi, Yuichi Kakudo, Shin Takahashi, Yasuhiro Sakamoto, Shunsuke Kato and Chikashi Ishioka

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.39

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      We performed comprehensive and comparative expression analysis in Saos-2 cells and identified DRAM as one of the genes that were more upregulated by S121F than wild-type p53. Overexpression of DRAM enhanced the ability to induce apoptosis in wild-type p53-dependent manner.

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      Optimization of routine KRAS mutation PCR-based testing procedure for rational individualized first-line-targeted therapy selection in metastatic colorectal cancer (pages 11–20)

      Anne-Sophie Chretien, Alexandre Harlé, Magali Meyer-Lefebvre, Marie Rouyer, Marie Husson, Carole Ramacci, Valentin Harter, Pascal Genin, Agnès Leroux and Jean-Louis Merlin

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.47

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      We performed our study with three techniques (TaqMan, HRM and PCR-RFLP) on 674 paraffin embedded tumors specimens and processed retrospectively discrepancies with a fourth one (CE-IVD COBAS 4800 KRAS mutation test).The main finding of this study is to propose a routine scheme for the determination of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancers ensuring high specificity and appropriate delay for first line prescription of anti-EGFR antibodies.

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      Gene expression of the IGF pathway family distinguishes subsets of gastrointestinal stromal tumors wild type for KIT and PDGFRA (pages 21–31)

      Carol Beadling, Janice Patterson, Emily Justusson, Dylan Nelson, Maria A. Pantaleo, Jason L. Hornick, Matias Chacón, Christopher L. Corless and Michael C. Heinrich

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.57

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      The IGF1R pathway has been proposed as a therapeutic target for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) that lack mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. Our data indicate heterogeneity among the “wild-type” GISTs in the expression of components of the IGF pathway, and differences among these subtypes of wild-type GIST will likely impact the application of targeted therapies. Clinical strategies targeting the IGF pathway will need to take into account that wild-type GISTs do not comprise a homogeneous population.

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      Bisebromoamide, an extract from Lyngbya species, induces apoptosis through ERK and mTOR inhibitions in renal cancer cells (pages 32–39)

      Kenjiro Suzuki, Ryuichi Mizuno, Kiyotake Suenaga, Toshiaki Teruya, Nobuyuki Tanaka, Takeo Kosaka and Mototsugu Oya

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.53

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      This is the first study that evaluated the effectiveness of Bisebromoamide for cancer cells. Bisebromoamide suppresses RCC proliferation and potentiates apoptosis by inhibiting both the Raf/MEK/ERK and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways. Bisebromoamide may thus be a promising agent for the treatment of RCC.

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      Targeting phosphodiesterase 3B enhances cisplatin sensitivity in human cancer cells (pages 40–49)

      Katsuhiro Uzawa, Atsushi Kasamatsu, Takao Baba, Katsuya Usukura, Yasuhiro Saito, Kentaro Sakuma, Manabu Iyoda, Yosuke Sakamoto, Katsunori Ogawara, Masashi Shiiba and Hideki Tanzawa

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.56

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      In vivo confirmation of enhancement of cisplatin sensitivity by cilostazol.

  3. Clinical Cancer Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Meeting Report
    1. Original Research

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      Preventive effects of low-dose aspirin on colorectal adenoma growth in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis: double-blind, randomized clinical trial (pages 50–56)

      Hideki Ishikawa, Keiji Wakabayashi, Sadao Suzuki, Michihiro Mutoh, Keiji Hirata, Tomiyo Nakamura, Ikuko Takeyama, Atsuko Kawano, Nobuhisa Gondo, Takashi Abe, Shinkan Tokudome, Chiho Goto, Nariaki Matsuura and Toshiyuki Sakai

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.46

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      We report a randomized clinical trial of aspirin in Asian patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Our results may impact on preventive measures against colorectal cancer development in FAP patients and improve their quality of life.

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      Anti-human-cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G levels in glioma risk and prognosis (pages 57–62)

      E. Susan Amirian, Deborah Marquez-Do, Melissa L. Bondy and Michael E. Scheurer

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.44

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      To date, studies on antibody response to HCMV in relation to glioma risk and survival have yielded relatively equivocal results. Our study contributes new evidence toward the potential importance of the direct and indirect effects of HCMV infection in gliomagenesis.

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      Early detection of clinically significant prostate cancer at diagnosis: a prospective study using a novel panel of TMPRSS2:ETS fusion gene markers (pages 63–75)

      Sam W. Chan, Phuong-Nam Nguyen, Philippe Violette, Fadi Brimo, Yosh Taguchi, Armen Aprikian and Junjian Z. Chen

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.49

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      We demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of incorporating a panel of fusion markers into a urine-based clinical test for prostate cancer detection. We identified extensive fusion diversity in the urine of PSA-screened men and developed a novel approach to combine fusion markers for better stratification of the cancer risk and aggressiveness. The clinical test and risk models may supplement existing clinical practices for the early and personalized diagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancers.

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      Targeting hyperactivation of the AKT survival pathway to overcome therapy resistance of melanoma brain metastases (pages 76–85)

      Heike Niessner, Andrea Forschner, Bernhard Klumpp, Jürgen B. Honegger, Maria Witte, Antje Bornemann, Reinhard Dummer, Annemarie Adam, Jürgen Bauer, Ghazaleh Tabatabai, Keith Flaherty, Tobias Sinnberg, Daniela Beck, Ulrike Leiter, Cornelia Mauch, Alexander Roesch, Benjamin Weide, Thomas Eigentler, Dirk Schadendorf, Claus Garbe, Dagmar Kulms, Leticia Quintanilla-Martinez and Friedegund Meier

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.50

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      In patients with metastatic melanoma, brain metastases are the most common cause of death. Our findings suggest that hyperactivation of the AKT survival pathway in melanoma brain metastases promotes the survival and drug resistance of melanoma cells in the brain parenchyma. Inhibition of this pathway thus has potential as a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma brain metastases.

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      A safe and effective dose of cisplatin in hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (pages 86–98)

      Akihiko Osaki, Takeshi Suda, Kenya Kamimura, Atsunori Tsuchiya, Yasushi Tamura, Masaaki Takamura, Masato Igarashi, Hirokazu Kawai, Satoshi Yamagiwa and Yutaka Aoyagi

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.55

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      An excess dose of cisplatin in hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma may enhance rapid tumor growth in case of resistance to cisplatin. A relationship between cisplatin dose and a tumor growth rate suggests that cisplatin (mg) should not be applied more than creatinine clearance (mL/min/1.73 m2) especially when it is not clear whether a target of HCC is sensitive or resistant to cisplatin, and the targeted liver volume should be smaller than 200 times of the CDDP dose (mg).

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      Metformin use and improved response to therapy in rectal cancer (pages 99–107)

      Heath D. Skinner, Christopher H. Crane, Christopher R. Garrett, Cathy Eng, George J. Chang, John M. Skibber, Miguel A. Rodriguez-Bigas, Patrick Kelly, Vlad C. Sandulache, Marc E. Delclos, Sunil Krishnan and Prajnan Das

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.54

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      In this study, we find that metformin use is associated with dramatically increased rates of pathological complete response in rectal cancer following chemoradiotherapy. This translates into significantly improved survival outcomes in these patients.

  4. Meeting Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Meeting Report
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Proceedings of the Indo-U.S. bilateral workshop on accelerating botanicals/biologics agent development research for cancer chemoprevention, treatment, and survival (pages 108–115)

      Nagi B. Kumar, Medha Dhurandhar, Bharat Aggarwal, Shrikant Anant, Kenyon Daniel, Gary Deng, Julie Djeu, Jinhui Dou, Ernest Hawk, B. Jayaram, Libin Jia, Rajendra Joshi, Madhuri Kararala, Devarajan Karunagaran, Omer Kucuk, Lalit Kumar, Mokenge Malafa, G. J. Samathanam, Fazlul Sarkar, Maqsood Siddiqi, Rana P. Singh, Anil Srivastava and Jeffrey D. White

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.42

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      With the evolving evidence of the promise of botanicals/biologics for cancer chemoprevention and treatment, the proceedings of the Indo-U.S. collaborative Workshop represent one of the most contemporary issues in Cancer Medicine.

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