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Cancer Medicine

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 1

February 2014

Volume 3, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–198

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.121

  2. Cancer Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. Original Research

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      Crosstalk between the mesothelium and lymphomatous cells: insight into the mechanisms involved in the progression of body cavity lymphomas (pages 1–13)

      Laura Lignitto, Adriana Mattiolo, Elena Negri, Luca Persano, Lisa Gianesello, Luigi Chieco-Bianchi and Maria Luisa Calabrò

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.159

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      Particular types of lymphoma, such as primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), develop preferentially in body cavities, suggesting a specific contribution of the intracavitary microenvironment to tumor pathogenesis. In this study, we show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition of mesothelium is involved in PEL progression and that mesothelium creates a milieu favorable to lymphoma growth. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms governing body cavity lymphoma progression and reveal new potential targets for lymphoma treatment.

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      The significance of dynamin 2 expression for prostate cancer progression, prognostication, and therapeutic targeting (pages 14–24)

      Bin Xu, Liang Hong Teng, Sabrina Daniela da Silva, Krikor Bijian, Samir Al Bashir, Su Jie, Michael Dolph, Moulay A. Alaoui-Jamali and Tarek A. Bismar

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.168

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      Dynamin 2 (Dyn 2) overexpression is a predictive marker for prostate cancer (PCA) progression and poor prognosis. Dyn2 inhibition prevents cell invasiveness in androgen-responsive and androgen-refractory PCA models, which support the potential of Dyn2 to serve as a therapeutic target for advanced PCA.

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      Identification of novel candidate compounds targeting TrkB to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma (pages 25–35)

      Yohko Nakamura, Akiko Suganami, Mayu Fukuda, Md. Kamrul Hasan, Tomoki Yokochi, Atsushi Takatori, Shunpei Satoh, Tyuji Hoshino, Yutaka Tamura and Akira Nakagawara

      Version of Record online: 1 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.175

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      An in silico Docking screening strategy demonstrated that novel small-molecular-weight chemicals were rapidly and effectively identified, followed by in vitro assays. Utilizing this approach, we found the candidate compounds targeting the extracellular domain of TrkB, which may help to develop a novel treatment and cure for childhood cancers including neuroblastoma.

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      The tankyrase-specific inhibitor JW74 affects cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis and differentiation in osteosarcoma cell lines (pages 36–46)

      Eva Wessel Stratford, Jeanette Daffinrud, Else Munthe, Russell Castro, Jo Waaler, Stefan Krauss and Ola Myklebost

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.170

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      The tankyrase inhibitor JW74 reduces Wnt/β-catenin signaling in osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines, affecting growth rates and inducing differentiation of poorly differentiated OS cells. Tankyrase inhibition thus represents a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of OS.

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      Early detection of antiangiogenic treatment responses in a mouse xenograft tumor model using quantitative perfusion MRI (pages 47–60)

      Reshmi Rajendran, Wei Huang, Annie Mei Yee Tang, Jie Ming Liang, Stephanie Choo, Torsten Reese, Hannes Hentze, Susan van Boxtel, Adam Cliffe, Keith Rogers, Brian Henry and Kai Hsiang Chuang

      Version of Record online: 6 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.177

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      Tumor angiogenesis provides essential functional information for diagnosis and prognosis and tumor perfusion is regarded as a marker for angiogenesis. We investigated a noninvasive technique, arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI, to measure tumor perfusion quantitatively. Our results indicate that tumor perfusion measured by ASL can detect early vascular responses, confirmed by histology, to treatment.

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      Factors associated with early progression of non-small-cell lung cancer treated by epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (pages 61–69)

      Nathalie Rozensztajn, Anne-Marie Ruppert, Armelle Lavole, Etienne Giroux Leprieur, Michael Duruisseaux, Thibault Vieira, Nathalie Rabbe, Roger Lacave, Martine Antoine, Jacques Cadranel and Marie Wislez

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.180

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      In non-small-cell-lung cancer, the choice between EGFR-TKI and cytotoxic therapy is still debated for second- or third-line therapy. In this setting, there is no restriction according to the EGFR-gene status. Our goal was to identify markers of early progression under treatment by EGFR-TKI in order to help clinicians to choose the best regimen. In a cohort of 268 patients that have been treated by EGFR-TKI, characteristics of patients who experienced early progression were compared to those of patients whose disease was controlled. We showed that presence of abdominal metastasis was independently associated with early progression in this cohort. Studies that address this matter are scarce. Although the clinical, pathological, and molecular markers that can predict a response to EGFR-TKI therapy are now well-known, no studies have searched potential markers associated with early progression versus stabilization under these treatments.

  3. Clinical Cancer Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. Review

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      Cancer in indigenous people in Latin America and the Caribbean: a review (pages 70–80)

      Suzanne P. Moore, David Forman, Marion Piñeros, Sdenka M. Fernández, Marceli de Oliveira Santos and Freddie Bray

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.134

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      This systematic review, the first global assessment of cancer profiles among indigenous peoples in Latin America and the Caribbean, found a paucity of published data. The results assembled do, however, point to poorer cancer outcomes among indigenous people, although aspects of the scale of the burden and the specific cancer profile of indigenous people in different countries are still to be elucidated, and require further research.

    2. Original Research

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      Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity (pages 81–90)

      Benjamin S. Misemer, Amy P. N. Skubitz, J. Carlos Manivel, Stephen C. Schmechel, Edward Y. Cheng, Jonathan C. Henriksen, Joseph S. Koopmeiners, Christopher L. Corless and Keith M. Skubitz

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.160

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      Immunohistochemistry and digital image analysis showed that the expression of ADAM12, FAP, WISP1, and SOX11 were markedly heterogeneous between and within aggressive fibromatosis (AF) cases, with higher expression in tumor areas in which cells had more “active” appearing nuclear features, suggesting that the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy. High levels of protein expression of ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1, and low expression of SOX11, were associated with worse clinical outcome, defined by early (≤1 year) recurrence after excision versus nonrecurrence at ≥5 years.

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      Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor: improved long-term survival with an intensive multimodal therapy and delayed radiotherapy. The Medical University of Vienna Experience 1992–2012 (pages 91–100)

      Irene Slavc, Monika Chocholous, Ulrike Leiss, Christine Haberler, Andreas Peyrl, Amedeo A. Azizi, Karin Dieckmann, Adelheid Woehrer, Christina Peters, Georg Widhalm, Christian Dorfer and Thomas Czech

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.161

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      We report on 22 consecutive patients with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) for whom long-term survival could be achieved in a higher number of patients than previously reported and propose a new treatment strategy. The drug combination and sequence used in the proposed regimen appear to be efficacious in preventing early relapses also in young children with M1–M3 stage disease allowing postponement of local radiotherapy to the end of treatment.

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      Psychological care of caregivers, nurses and physicians: a study of a new approach (pages 101–110)

      Maurizio S. Abeni, Margherita Magni, Martina Conte, Silvia Mangiacavalli, Lara Pochintesta, Gaia Vicenzi, Virginia V. Ferretti, Alessandra Pompa, Federica Cocito, Catherine Klersy and Alessandro Corso

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.163

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      This study suggests that a work group, promoting sharing and collaboration, leads to the induction of mature defenses enabling reality to be faced in a more adaptive and effective way. Results of this study offer a useful starting point for the planning and the development of future studies with the aim to evaluate the efficacy of the “Balint Group” modified method on caregivers' quality of life and on the ability of physicians and nurses to deal with stressful situations.

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      Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer (pages 111–117)

      Stanley K. T. Yu, Aneel Bhangu, Diana M. Tait, Paris Tekkis, Andrew Wotherspoon and Gina Brown

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.169

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      Only patients who demonstrate >50% size reduction show a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after chemoradiotherapy. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified.

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      Anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangements in patients with advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer: CT characteristics and response to chemotherapy (pages 118–123)

      Jangchul Park, Hidekazu Yamaura, Yasushi Yatabe, Waki Hosoda, Chiaki Kondo, Junichi Shimizu, Yoshitsugu Horio, Kimihide Yoshida, Kosuke Tanaka, Tomoyo Oguri, Yoshihisa Kobayashi and Toyoaki Hida

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.172

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      Advanced-stage anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive tumors have a relatively aggressive phenotype, which cannot be inferred from the size of the tumor alone. ALK-positive patients have a good response to first-line cytotoxic drugs and to crizotinib as second-line therapy, but a relatively poor response to cytotoxic drugs as second-line therapy.

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      Does the type of first-line regimens influence the receipt of second-line chemotherapy treatment? An analysis of 3211 metastatic colon cancer patients (pages 124–133)

      Zhiyuan Zheng, Nader Hanna, Eberechukwu Onukwugha, Emily S. Reese, Brian Seal and C. Daniel Mullins

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.176

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      The specific first line regimens influence elderly metastatic colon cancer (mCC) patients' likelihood of receiving second-line treatment. Second-line treatment among elderly mCC patients requires clinicians and policy makers to consider patients' initial treatment as well as patient characteristics.

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      HER2 overexpression a major risk factor for recurrence in pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer: results from a French regional cohort (pages 134–142)

      Philippe Rouanet, Pascal Roger, Emilie Rousseau, Severine Thibault, Gilles Romieu, Andre Mathieu, Jacques Cretin, Gilbert Barneon, Mireille Granier, Aurelie Maran-Gonzalez, Jean P. Daures, Florence Boissiere and Frederic Bibeau

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.167

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      The management of pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer remains an area of controversy. Ten-year results from 714 small breast carcinoma (SBC) showed 6.1% human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression, a 10-year overall survival of 94%, worse for HER2+ tumors (hormonal receptor [HR]:3.89). Hormonal therapy for HR+ HER2+ SBC is not sufficient, a personalized management may be required.

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      Classification of AIDS-related lymphoma cases between 1987 and 2012 in Japan based on the WHO classification of lymphomas, fourth edition (pages 143–153)

      Yasunori Ota, Tsunekazu Hishima, Makoto Mochizuki, Yoshinori Kodama, Suzuko Moritani, Naoki Oyaizu, Sohtaro Mine, Atsushi Ajisawa, Junko Tanuma, Tomoko Uehira, Shotaro Hagiwara, Keishiro Yajima, Yusuke Koizumi, Takuma Shirasaka, Yuki Kojima, Hirokazu Nagai, Yoshiyuki Yokomaku, Yumiko Shiozawa, Tomohiko Koibuchi, Aikichi Iwamoto, Shinichi Oka, Hideki Hasegawa, Seiji Okada and Harutaka Katano

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.178

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      In this study, the authors classified AIDS-related lymphoma cases, diagnosed between 1987 and 2012 in Japan, according to the WHO classification of lymphomas, fourth edition. This study revealed the proportions and clincopathological features of each histological subtype of AIDS-related lymphoma during the study period. The authors also propose a set of biological markers that can be used for the classification of AIDS-related lymphoma.

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      Access, excess, and overdiagnosis: the case for thyroid cancer (pages 154–161)

      Stephen F. Hall, Jonathan Irish, Patti Groome and Rebecca Griffiths

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.184

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      The funders of health care are facing progressively increasing costs due to the increasing numbers of women with thyroid cancer. The rates of diagnosis varied up to four times across the health care/geographic regions of Ontario and our findings suggest that differences in access to or use of medical diagnostic tests by more educated, urban and healthier patient populations is driving the increasing incidence of thyroid cancer.

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      BMVC test, an improved fluorescence assay for detection of malignant pleural effusions (pages 162–173)

      I-Ting Lin, Yu-Lin Tsai, Chi-Chih Kang, Wei-Chun Huang, Chiung-Lin Wang, Mei-Ying Lin, Pei-Jen Lou, Jin-Yuan Shih, Hao-Chien Wang, Huey-Dong Wu, Tzu-Hsiu Tsai, I-Shiow Jan and Ta-Chau Chang

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.179

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      In this study, we developed a system, named BMVC test, to provide simple, fast and accurate detection of malignant pleural effusions without human bias or grey zone in traditional cytologic examination. With a sensitive fluorescence probe, cell collecting kits, and digital process, BMVC test provides results in a short time with a high accuracy of 91.6% (98/107). Also, the digital and objective results could assist cytologic examination to become more clear-cut.

  4. Cancer Prevention

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cancer Biology
    4. Clinical Cancer Research
    5. Cancer Prevention
    1. Original Research

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Noninvasive detection of lung cancer using exhaled breath (pages 174–181)

      Xiao-An Fu, Mingxiao Li, Ralph J. Knipp, Michael H. Nantz and Michael Bousamra

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.162

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      We used microreactor to capture all carbonyl compounds in exhaled breath and analyzed captured compounds by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). We have identified four biomarkers for lung cancer diagnosis.

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      HPV DNA testing improves CIN2+ risk stratification and detection of CIN2+ in delayed triage of ASCUS and LSIL. A population-based follow-up study from Western Norway (pages 182–189)

      Elisabeth B. Budal, Hans K. Haugland, Robert Skar, Bjørn O. Mæhle, Tone Bjørge and Olav K. Vintermyr

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.171

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      The effect of implementing human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in delayed triage of ASCUS and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) was studied in a cohort of women from Western Norway. An improved stratification of CIN2+ risk and selection of more clinical relevant lesions was reported on. Also, more CIN2+ was recovered and CIN2+ detected at an earlier time point.

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      A variant upstream of HLA-DRB1 and multiple variants in MICA influence susceptibility to cervical cancer in a Swedish population (pages 190–198)

      Dan Chen, Joanna Hammer, David Lindquist, Annika Idahl and Ulf Gyllensten

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cam4.183

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      We have performed a large nested case–control cohort to validate findings in the first cervical cancer GWAS. We replicated the associations with rs9272143 located in the MHC class II region as well as with rs2516448 and MICA-A5.1 in the class I region. In addition, we found protective effects of MICA-A4 and MICA-A5 against cervical cancer, attesting to the importance of the allelic variability at MICA for both recognition of infection and evasion of tumor surveillance.

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