Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds

Cover image for Vol. 22 Issue 1

January/February 2011

Volume 22, Issue 1

Pages 1–78

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.389

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial (page 1)

      Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann and Daniel Thalmann

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.388

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Research Articles
    1. Multiscale motion saliency for keyframe extraction from motion capture sequences (pages 3–14)

      Cihan Halit and Tolga Capin

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.380

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper proposes an automatic approach to extract keyframes from a motion capture sequence. The method treats the input sequence as motion curves; reduces the dimension of the motion capture data using Principal Component Analysis; and obtains the most salient parts of these curves using a new multiscale metric, called 'motion saliency'.

    2. Feature sensitive deformation for triangular mesh models (pages 15–25)

      Jun He, Caiming Zhang, Yu Wei and Weitao Li

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.381

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We propose a novel surface deformation method based on a feature sensitive (FS) metric. Using a FS Laplacian operator and the tetrahedron constraints, our new method preserves features of triangular meshes very well during deformation.

    3. GPU rigid skinning based on a refined skeletonization method (pages 27–46)

      Andreas A. Vasilakis and Ioannis Fudos

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.382

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper presents a skeletal rigid skinning approach. First, a skeleton extraction technique is introduced that produces refined skeletons appropriate for skinning. Then, to avoid shortcomings of previous skinning approaches, an efficient and robust rigid skinning technique is developed that applies blending patches around joints. To achieve real time animation, all steps of the rigid skinning algorithm have been ported on the GPU. Finally, an evaluation of the proposed techniques is presented against four criteria: performance, quality, scope, and robustness.

    4. Efficient lookup table based camera pose estimation for augmented reality (pages 47–58)

      Shiqi Li and Chi Xu

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.385

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nowadays, the marker-based mobile augmented reality should rely on time-consuming iterative scheme in pose estimation procedure for accuracy and stability due to the absence of redundant point correspondences. We present an efficient LUT-based pose estimation solution which achieves high stability in the presence of noise better than the most robust and accurate iterative solutions available in the field, with the same level of accuracy and a much lower computational complexity.

    5. Combining path planners and motion graphs (pages 59–78)

      B.J.H. van Basten, A. Egges and R. Geraerts

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.387

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Combining path planning and motion graphs introduces several problems. We will identify two problems and propose possible solutions. The first problem is selecting an appropriate distance metric for locomotion synthesis. We have evaluated three common distance metrics and propose a set of guidelines. The second problem is that there is no single point on the body that can follow a generated path without causing unnatural artifacts. We will show that our solution, which uses path abstractions, generates significantly better animations.

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