The impact of fragrance on consumer choice

Authors

  • Daniel Milotic

    Corresponding author
    1. Category Development Executive Colgate-Palmolive, Level 15, 345 George St., Sydney, NSW, 2001 Australia
    • Category Development Executive Colgate-Palmolive, Level 15, 345 George St., Sydney, NSW, 2001 Australia
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    • Daniel Milotic has been working within the FMCG industry since graduating with a Bachelor of Business-Marketing in 1996. He has recently completed a Masters of Business in marketing (Distinction Average) at the University of Technology, Sydney. He is currently employed by Colgate Palmolive Australia and works within the Customer Marketing department, where his primary responsibility is to manage the syndicated (scan and homescan) data and its application throughout the business. Prior to joining Colgate he was employed by Unilever Foods—Australia. Over the past six years he has held various positions including Business Accounts Manager, Field Sales Manager, Business Analyst and Sales Representative and has won numerous company awards throughout his career.


Abstract

The following research focuses on fragrance (sense of smell) as a primary driver in consumer choice. The fragrance industry is also discussed, along with the impact of atmospherics and the surrounding environment on the consumer. A case study on bar soaps shows how changes to the product fragrance or packaging can affect the purchase decision.

The learning and recommendations apply directly to the formation of marketing strategy and are particularly important to categories such as body cleaning and other categories where fragrance is a primary driver in consumer choice, as well as (to a lesser extent) any products that are (or might be potentially) fragranced. The findings affect the ultimate product packaging, colour, appearance and fragrance. Copyright © 2003 Henry Stewart Publications.

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