Consumer response to interruption features and need for cognitive closure

Authors

  • Mihai Niculescu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Marketing, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA
    • Correspondence to: Mihai Niculescu, Assistant Professor of Marketing, Department of Marketing, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Dept. 5280, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001, USA.

      E-mail: niculem@nmsu.edu

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    • Associate Professor of Marketing at New Mexico State University
  • Collin R. Payne,

    1. Department of Marketing, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA
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    • Associate Professor of Marketing at New Mexico State University
  • Cuauhtémoc Luna-Nevarez

    1. Department of Marketing, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA
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    • Assistant Professor of Marketing at Sacred Heart University

ABSTRACT

Prior research on interruptions focuses entirely on the process being interrupted and assumes interruption homogeneity. Across two studies, we examine how heterogeneous features of interruptions (i.e., timing, frequency, and perceived pleasantness) and consumer individual differences (i.e., need for cognitive closure (NFCC)) impact consumer response toward a product. We find interruption features have opposing effects on consumer response for consumers high versus low in NFCC—depending upon the perceived valence of the interruption. Specifically, individuals with high NFCC respond better to a product when interruptions are perceived to be pleasant and occur late or infrequently. In contrast, those who have low NFCC respond better to a product when interruptions are perceived to be pleasant and occur early or perceived to be unpleasant and occur infrequently. The role of interruption pleasantness is discussed in terms of its predictive power for perceived pleasant but not perceived unpleasant interruptions. Finally, study findings are placed within marketing contexts that guide managerial implications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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