Salesperson characteristics affecting consumer complaint responses

Authors

  • Stephen W. Clopton,

    Corresponding author
    1. John A. Walker College of Business, Appalachian State University, 4104 Raley Hall, Boone, NC 28608, USA
    • John A. Walker College of Business, Appalachian State University, 4104 Raley Hall, Boone, NC 28608, USA
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    • Stephen W. Clopton (PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) is Professor of Marketing at the John A. Walker College of Business at Appalachian State University. His research has been published in such journals as Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Decision Sciences, International Journal of Purchasing and Materials Management and Journal of Marketing Education.

  • James E. Stoddard,

    1. John A. Walker College of Business, Appalachian State University, 4104 Raley Hall, Boone, NC 28608, USA
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    • James E. Stoddard (PhD, Virginia Tech) is Assistant Professor of Marketing at the John A. Walker College of Business at Appalachian State University. His research has been published in Psychology & Marketing, Journal of Marketing Channels and Services Marketing Quarterly.

  • Jennifer W. Clay

    1. Rockwell Automation, Dodge Marion, 510 Rockwell Drive, Marion, NC 28752, USA
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    • Jennifer W. Clay is a Buyer for Dodge/Rockwell Automation. She holds a BS degree with Honours in Marketing from Appalachian State University.


Abstract

The important relationship between consumer complaint behaviour and brand and store loyalty is well established. The range of factors that favourably influence the outcomes of complaining have received relatively less research attention. Therefore, this study tests the effects of two salesperson source characteristics: willingness to listen and product/store knowledge, on consumer complaint-related perceptions and intentions in a retail setting. Mall shoppers participated in a consumer complaint experiment to test the hypothesised effects. The results indicate that both characteristics affect customer complaint responses, as well as consumer perceptions of the salesperson and the retail store. The findings of the study demonstrate that salesperson characteristics are important influences on positive or negative consumer complaint responses. Copyright © 2001 Henry Stewart Publications.

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