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Direct Conversion of Ethane to Ethanol by Engineered Cytochrome P450 BM3

Authors

  • Peter Meinhold,

    1. California Institute of Technology, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, M/C 210-41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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  • Matthew W. Peters,

    1. California Institute of Technology, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, M/C 210-41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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  • Michael M. Y. Chen,

    1. California Institute of Technology, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, M/C 210-41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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  • Katsuyuki Takahashi,

    1. California Institute of Technology, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, M/C 210-41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
    2. Current address: Biocatalysis & Bioprocess Group, Catalysis Science Laboratory, Mitsui Chemicals, Inc. 1144 Togo, Mobara, Chiba 297-0017, Japan
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  • Frances H. Arnold Prof.

    1. California Institute of Technology, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, M/C 210-41, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, Fax: (+1) 626-568-8743
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Abstract

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Picking on someone smaller. Cytochromes P450 catalyze the hydroxylation of thousands of substrates, including alkanes. No naturally occurring P450, however, is known to oxidize the smallest alkanes, ethane and methane. Here we report the direct and selective oxidation of ethane to ethanol using dioxygen, catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 BM-3 variant engineered for high activity towards small alkanes (see scheme). Achieving P450-catalyzed oxidation of ethane is a key step in the pathway to P450-catalyzed methane oxidation and opens new opportunities for the bioconversion of natural gas to fuels and chemicals.

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