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Inhibiting Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Fibril Formation by the Red Wine Compound Resveratrol

Authors

  • Rajesh Mishra Dr.,

    1. Faculty of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry I, Biophysical Chemistry, TU Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Strasse 6, 44227 Dortmund (Germany), Fax: (+49) 231-755-3901
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  • Daniel Sellin,

    1. Faculty of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry I, Biophysical Chemistry, TU Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Strasse 6, 44227 Dortmund (Germany), Fax: (+49) 231-755-3901
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  • Diana Radovan,

    1. Faculty of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry I, Biophysical Chemistry, TU Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Strasse 6, 44227 Dortmund (Germany), Fax: (+49) 231-755-3901
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  • Andrea Gohlke,

    1. Faculty of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry I, Biophysical Chemistry, TU Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Strasse 6, 44227 Dortmund (Germany), Fax: (+49) 231-755-3901
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  • Roland Winter Prof. Dr.

    1. Faculty of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry I, Biophysical Chemistry, TU Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Strasse 6, 44227 Dortmund (Germany), Fax: (+49) 231-755-3901
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Abstract

Grapes for amyloids: The red wine compound resveratrol can effectively inhibit the formation of IAPP amyloid that is found in type II diabetes. Our in vitro inhibition results do not depend on the antioxidant activity of resveratrol. Further, the markedly enhanced cell survival in the presence of resveratrol also indicates that the small oligomeric structures that are observed during β-sheet formation are not toxic and could be off-pathway assembly products.

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