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The Future of Aminoglycosides: The End or Renaissance?

Authors

  • Jacob L. Houghton ,

    1. Department of Medicinal Chemistry in the College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA), Fax: (+1) 734-615-5521
    2. Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • Keith D. Green Dr.,

    1. Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • Wenjing Chen ,

    1. Chemical Biology Doctoral Program, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
    2. Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova Dr.

    1. Department of Medicinal Chemistry in the College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA), Fax: (+1) 734-615-5521
    2. Chemical Biology Doctoral Program, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
    3. Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, 210 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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Abstract

Although aminoglycosides have been used as antibacterials for decades, their use has been hindered by their inherent toxicity and the resistance that has emerged to these compounds. It seems that such issues have relegated a formerly front-line class of antimicrobials to the proverbial back shelf. However, recent advances have demonstrated that novel aminoglycosides have a potential to overcome resistance as well as to be used to treat HIV-1 and even human genetic disorders, with abrogated toxicity. It is not the end for aminoglycosides, but rather, the challenges faced by researchers have led to ingenuity and a change in how we view this class of compounds, a renaissance.

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