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Stereoselectivity of Isolated Dehydratase Domains of the Borrelidin Polyketide Synthase: Implications for cis Double Bond Formation

Authors

  • Dr. Olivia Vergnolle,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB21GA (UK), Fax: (+44) 1223-766002
    2. Present address: Biology Department, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210 (USA)
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Dr. Frank Hahn,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB21GA (UK), Fax: (+44) 1223-766002
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Dr. Abel Baerga-Ortiz,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB21GA (UK), Fax: (+44) 1223-766002
    2. Present address: School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico)
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  • Prof. Dr. Peter F. Leadlay,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB21GA (UK), Fax: (+44) 1223-766002
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  • Dr. Jennifer N. Andexer

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB21GA (UK), Fax: (+44) 1223-766002
    2. Present address: Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Albertstrasse 25, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)
    • Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB21GA (UK), Fax: (+44) 1223-766002
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Abstract

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Not a matter of preference: The polyketide borrelidin contains both a trans and a cis double bond. The corresponding dehydratases in the polyketide synthase are found to have identical preferences for thioester substrates in vitro and to generate trans double bonds, undermining the idea that cis double bonds arise from dehydration of 3S rather than 3R alcohols.

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