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Engineering Biofilms for Biocatalysis

Authors

  • Dr. Andreas N. Tsoligkas,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Birmingham University, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (UK), Fax: (+44) 121-414-5324
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  • Michael Winn,

    1. School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (UK), Fax: (+44) 1603-592003
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  • Dr. James Bowen,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Birmingham University, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (UK), Fax: (+44) 121-414-5324
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  • Dr. Tim W. Overton,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Birmingham University, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (UK), Fax: (+44) 121-414-5324
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  • Dr. Mark J. H. Simmons,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Birmingham University, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (UK), Fax: (+44) 121-414-5324
    • School of Chemical Engineering, Birmingham University, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (UK), Fax: (+44) 121-414-5324
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  • Dr. Rebecca J. M. Goss

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (UK), Fax: (+44) 1603-592003
    • School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (UK), Fax: (+44) 1603-592003
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Abstract

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Biofilm, friend not foe: Single species biofilms can be engineered to form robust biocatalysts with greater catalytic activity and significantly improved catalytic longevity than purified and immobilised enzymes. We report the engineering, structural analysis and biocatalytic capability of a biofilm that can mediate the conversion of serine and haloindoles to halotryptophans (see scheme).

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