Cytotoxic Fatty Acid Amides from Xenorhabdus

Authors

  • Anna Proschak,

    1. Molekulare Biotechnologie, Institut für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Katharina Schultz,

    1. Institut für Pharmazeutische Biotechnologie, Universität des Saarlandes, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jennifer Herrmann,

    1. Institut für Pharmazeutische Biotechnologie, Universität des Saarlandes, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Andrea J. Dowling,

    1. Biosciences, University of Exeter in Cornwall, Tremough Campus, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ (UK)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Alexander O. Brachmann,

    1. Molekulare Biotechnologie, Institut für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Richard ffrench-Constant,

    1. Biosciences, University of Exeter in Cornwall, Tremough Campus, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ (UK)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Rolf Müller,

    1. Institut für Pharmazeutische Biotechnologie, Universität des Saarlandes, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)
    2. Helmhotz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), Helmhotz Center for Infectious Research (HZI), Department Microbial Natural Products, Saarland University, Campus C2.3, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Prof. Dr. Helge B. Bode

    Corresponding author
    1. Molekulare Biotechnologie, Institut für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
    • Molekulare Biotechnologie, Institut für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

original image

Simple and bioactive: 26 acyl amides have been identified in cultures of different Xenorhabdus strains and several analogues have been synthesised. Despite their simple chemical structure, several of these compounds show cytotoxicity against mammalian cell lines and insect haemocytes, thus indicating that they have a role in the complex life cycle of these bacteria.

Ancillary