ChemBioChem

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 7

May 3, 2010

Volume 11, Issue 7

Pages 833–998

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Sphingosine Kinase Interacting Protein is an A-Kinase Anchoring Protein Specific for Type I cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (ChemBioChem 7/2010) (page 833)

      Duangnapa Kovanich , Marcel A. G. van der Heyden, Thin Thin Aye, Toon A. B. van Veen, Albert J. R. Heck  and Arjen Scholten 

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201090025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a collage of crystal structures of the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA-R). At the bottom, the dimeric N-terminal dimerization domain (13–62) of PKA-RIα in complex with the D-AKAP2 anchoring domain (green, PDB ID: 3IM4). On top, two units of PKA-RIα (92–380, 1RGS, red and blue) with four molecules of bound cAMP (black). A chemical proteomics approach using immobilized synthetic cAMP analogues (8-AHA-cAMP and 8AHA-2′-OMe-cAMP, top right) was amended to show that SPHKAP is the first mammalian PKA-RI-specific AKAP. Isotope-labeled dimethylation (MS spectrum) was used for quantitation. SPHKAP was found to be highly expressed in human heart. Specific amino acids at specific locations in the anchoring domain of SPHKAP obey all the postulated rules to drive the observed PKA-RI specificity. For more information, see the paper by A. Scholten et al. on p. 963 ff. (The background was generated from an image of the heart of a 64-year-old male taken from Wikipedia.)

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Giant Vesicles: Preparations and Applications (ChemBioChem 7/2010) (page 834)

      Peter Walde, Katia Cosentino, Helen Engel and Pasquale Stano

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201090026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover picture shows giant phospholipid vesicles containing different lipid- and water-soluble fluorescent probes and a scheme indicating typical vesicle dimensions. Arrows denote that there are various ways of preparing giant vesicles. For details, see the Review by P. Walde et al. on p. 848 ff. Images courtesy of Paolo Carrara (Roma Tre University)

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Giant Vesicles: Preparations and Applications (pages 848–865)

      Peter Walde, Katia Cosentino, Helen Engel and Pasquale Stano

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      They might be giants: As giant vesicle membranes resemble the enclosed lipid matrix of the plasma membrane of a biological cell, there is currently a large interest in preparing cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles. Here we summarize the known methods for preparing giant unilamellar vesicles and point out the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

    2. A Versatile Endoribonuclease Mimic Made of DNA: Characteristics and Applications of the 8–17 RNA-Cleaving DNAzyme (pages 866–879)

      Kenny Schlosser  and Yingfu Li

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.200900786

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cutting RNA with DNA: The “8–17” DNAzyme is a short single-stranded DNA molecule that can function like an endoribonuclease and catalyze the efficient and site-specific cleavage of cognate RNA molecules. This review provides a comprehensive discussion of the characteristics and applications of this unique DNA-based enzyme.

    3. The Future of Aminoglycosides: The End or Renaissance? (pages 880–902)

      Jacob L. Houghton , Keith D. Green, Wenjing Chen  and Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.200900779

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microbes, HALT! Since the 1940s toxicity, resistance, and complex chemical syntheses have been associated with the use of aminoglycosides as antibacterials and antivirals. However, aminoglycosides have regrouped and are ready for a rematch. We present an overview of the problems and the new developments they have in their arsenal for combat.

    4. Chemical and Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Glycopeptide Selectin Ligands Containing Sialyl Lewis X Structures (pages 904–930)

      Maciej Pudelko, James Bull and Horst Kunz

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000029

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbohydrates play essential roles in various cell-adhesion events, such as between Lewis saccharides and carbohydrate-recognising proteins: the selectins. This article provides an overview of recent syntheses of glycopeptide selectin ligands, including carbohydrate motifs and scaffold modifications that might improve the affinity of these structures for receptors.

  6. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. DNA-Encoded Chemical Libraries: A Tool for Drug Discovery and for Chemical Biology (pages 931–937)

      Jörg Scheuermann and Dario Neri

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DNA decoder: The collection of organic molecules, individually coupled to distinctive oligonucleotides, is generally referred to as “DNA-encoded chemical library”. In full analogy to phage display technology, these libraries can be panned on immobilized target proteins and analyzed (before and after selection) by suitable “decoding” methods (for example, DNA-sequencing).

    2. Mechanisms of RNA Degradation by the Eukaryotic Exosome (pages 938–945)

      Rafal Tomecki, Karolina Drazkowska and Andrzej Dziembowski

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      RNA on its way to destruction: The exosome is a multi-subunit protein complex involved in essentially all phenomena associated with RNA metabolism in eukaryotic cells. This review discusses recent discoveries in the fields of biochemistry and structural biology that have shed new light on the mechanisms of RNA recruitment to the catalytic subunits of the exosome.

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Images Come to Life (pages 947–949)

      Tamar Ratner and Ehud Keinan 

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000049

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Leading edge: Research at the interface between molecular biology and computer science has led to a design for genetically encoded edge-detection based on an isogenic community of E. coli bacteria that sense a light image, communicate among themselves to identify the light–dark edges, and finally present the computation outcome visually.

    2. Two Functions, One Molecule: A Metal-Binding and a Targeting Moiety to Combat Alzheimer's Disease (pages 950–953)

      Christelle Hureau , Isabelle Sasaki , Emmanuel Gras  and Peter Faller 

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000102

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Merging pharmacophores: Aggregation of the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ) is responsible for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Metal ions bound to Aβ can promote aggregation and oxidative stress, and can thus have a detrimental effect. Disruption of these processes with chelators, as well as targeting these chelators towards Aβ aggregates is therefore a promising strategy.

    3. Developing High-Affinity Boron-Based Receptors for Cell-Surface Carbohydrates (pages 954–957)

      Todd A. Houston

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000079

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The rich history of research into boron–carbohydrate interactions has, unfortunately, not translated into many examples of boron-based receptors for cell-surface sugars. However, a recent breakthrough by Hall has shown that hexoses can be targeted with boroxole-based systems (1) that show selective binding of the TF antigen in competition with natural lectins.

  8. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Low pH-Triggered Model Drug Molecule Release from Virus-Like Particles (pages 959–962)

      Noriko Ohtake, Kenichi Niikura, Tadaki Suzuki, Keita Nagakawa, Shintaro Mikuni, Yasutaka Matsuo, Masataka Kinjo, Hirofumi Sawa and Kuniharu Ijiro

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000094

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let it go: Virus-like particles (VLPs) incorporating a peptide-tag were constructed. Fluorescent dye molecules attached to nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) were encapsulated within the VLPs as model drug molecules by using the affinity between a hexahistidine motif (His6) and NTA. The model drug molecules were released under acidic conditions due to the protonation of histidines.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. Sphingosine Kinase Interacting Protein is an A-Kinase Anchoring Protein Specific for Type I cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (pages 963–971)

      Duangnapa Kovanich , Marcel A. G. van der Heyden, Thin Thin Aye, Toon A. B. van Veen, Albert J. R. Heck  and Arjen Scholten 

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000058

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rather have I than II: Quantitative chemical proteomics based on immobilized cAMP in conjunction with classic biochemical interaction studies was used to characterize SPHKAP as the first mammalian PKA-RI- rather than PKA-RII-specific AKAP.

    2. Photocaged T7 RNA Polymerase for the Light Activation of Transcription and Gene Function in Pro- and Eukaryotic Cells (pages 972–977)

      Chungjung Chou, Douglas D. Young and Alexander Deiters

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      There's a time and a place: A lightactivatable bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) was generated through the site-specific introduction of a photocaged tyrosine residue at the crucial position Tyr639 within the active site of the enzyme. This enabled photochemical control of RNA polymerization, and was applied to the spatiotemporal regulation of gene function in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    3. Impact of the C-terminal Disulfide Bond on the Folding and Stability of Onconase (pages 978–986)

      Cindy Schulenburg, Ulrich Weininger, Piotr Neumann , Heike Meiselbach, Milton T. Stubbs, Heinrich Sticht, Jochen Balbach, Renate Ulbrich-Hofmann and Ulrich Arnold

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.200900773

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stability of onconase: The C-terminal disulfide bond of onconase stabilizes the protein by attenuation of the dynamics in the native protein.

    4. LICRED: A Versatile Drop-In Vector for Rapid Generation of Redox-Self-Sufficient Cytochrome P450s (pages 987–994)

      Federico Sabbadin, Ralph Hyde, Aelig Robin, Eva-Maria Hilgarth, Marie Delenne, Sabine Flitsch, Nicholas Turner, Gideon Grogan and Neil C. Bruce

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000104

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new platform, LICRED, enables the high-throughput generation of chimeric cytochromes P450 by fusing a library of haem domains to a generic reductase by ligation-independent cloning. This strategy can be used to characterise orphan P450s for which the function has not been determined and also to generate libraries of redox-self-sufficient biocatalysts.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemBioChem 8/2010 (page 998)

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201090029

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION