ChemBioChem

Cover image for ChemBioChem

Special Issue: Epigenetics

January 24, 2011

Volume 12, Issue 2

Pages 181–335

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Full Papers
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    1. Cover Picture: (ChemBioChem 2/2011) (page 181)

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190000

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      The cover picture shows the puzzle of epigenetics research: studying molecular marks at the interface of genetics and genomics, biochemistry and cell biology, developmental biology and molecular medicine. This composition is reflected in the varied papers that make up this special epigenetics issue of ChemBioChem.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Full Papers
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemBioChem 2/2011 (pages 185–188)

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190001

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
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    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemBioChem 2/2011 (pages 190–192)

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190002

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Full Papers
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    1. Mechanism(s) of SWI/SNF-Induced Nucleosome Mobilization (pages 196–204)

      Ning Liu, Angela Balliano and Prof. Dr. Jeffrey J. Hayes

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000455

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      Twists and turns! Aspects of nucleosome alteration by the SWI/SNF complex, the archetypal remodeling enzyme are reviewed by focusing on experiments that provide insights into how SWI/SNF induces nucleosome translocation along DNA.

    2. Structure and Function of Mammalian DNA Methyltransferases (pages 206–222)

      Dr. Renata Zofia Jurkowska, Dr. Tomasz Piotr Jurkowski and Prof. Dr. Albert Jeltsch

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000195

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      New model of genomic DNA methylation: The introduction of 5-methylcytosine (see picture) into DNA is an essential epigenetic signal involved in development and disease. We review the structures and functions of the mammalian DNA methyltransferases Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, including novel mechanisms involved in their targeting and regulation.

    3. Quantitative Proteomics for Epigenetics (pages 224–234)

      H. Christian Eberl, Prof. Matthias Mann and Dr. Michiel Vermeulen

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000429

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      Mechanisms of epigenetic regulation of gene expression: Current mass spectrometry-based proteomics technology allows for unbiased and quantitative screening for post-translational modifications, protein–protein interactions, and expression changes. This review provides an overview of this technology and its applications in the field of epigenetics.

    4. Histone Tails: Ideal Motifs for Probing Epigenetics through Chemical Biology Approaches (pages 236–252)

      Dr. Philipp Voigt and Prof. Dr. Danny Reinberg

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000493

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      Heads or…? Chemical biology offers a powerful toolkit for unraveling the recognition and function of histone modifications. Beyond peptide-based methods, the introduction of site-specific modifications into histone proteins and reconstituted nucleosomes has fueled recent advances in chromatin biology.

    5. Structure and Function of Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methyltransferases and Demethylases (pages 254–263)

      Swathi Krishnan , Scott Horowitz  and Prof. Raymond C. Trievel

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000545

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      Multifaceted functions: Crystal structures of the lysine methyltransferase G9A, its homologue GLP, and the lysine demethylase PHF8 have shed new light on enzymatic regulation of histone H3K9 methylation and its roles in transcriptional regulation and other chromatin-associated functions.

    6. Spreading Chromatin into Chemical Biology (pages 264–279)

      Prof. Dr. C. David Allis and Prof. Dr. Tom W. Muir

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000761

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      Package and regulate: Because chromatin is the physiological template of our genome, elaborate mechanisms exist to introduce meaningful variation into this DNA–histone complex to alter gene expression and other important biological processes. Here we propose that chemically defined, “designer chromatin” will be invaluable in sorting out fundamental issues in chromatin biology and epigenetics. (Cross-stitch by Lindsey Baker)

  6. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Full Papers
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    1. Catalysis and Mechanistic Insights into Sirtuin Activation (pages 281–289)

      Kristin E. Dittenhafer-Reed, Jessica L. Feldman and Dr. John M. Denu

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000434

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      It's gotta be sirtuin: The central role of the NAD+-dependent lysine deacetylase SIRT1 in metabolic and age-related pathways has pushed it to the forefront for discovering small-molecule activators. SIRT1 activation pathways, the assays used to discover these compounds as well as the structural and mechanistic implications of their function, and the recent debate surrounding small-molecule activators are discussed.

    2. KAT(ching) Metabolism by the Tail: Insight into the Links between Lysine Acetyltransferases and Metabolism (pages 290–298)

      Brittany N. Albaugh , Kevin M. Arnold  and Prof. Dr. John M. Denu

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000438

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      Crosstalk between KATs and metablism: The utilization of acyl-CoAs by lysine acetyltransferase (KATs) links their activities to central metabolic processes. We summarize newly identified acyl-modifications, discuss the control of KAT activity by cellular acetyl-CoA levels, and provide insights into how acetylation regulates metabolic proteins.

    3. Dynamic Interplay between Histone H3 Modifications and Protein Interpreters: Emerging Evidence for a “Histone Language” (pages 299–307)

      Samuel S. Oliver and Dr. John M. Denu

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000474

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      Tweaking the tail: The most N-terminal region of histone H3 contains a high density of post-translationally modifiable residues. We focus here on the dynamic interplay between modification states on the H3 N terminus and the binding modules that recognize them and propose a model of how this interplay contributes to androgen-receptor-mediated gene activation.

    4. A Modified Epigenetics Toolbox to Study Histone Modifications on the Nucleosome Core (pages 308–313)

      Dr. Floor Frederiks, Dr. Iris J. E. Stulemeijer, Dr. Huib Ovaa and Dr. Fred van Leeuwen

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000617

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      Precision methylation: Recent developments in genetic engineering and chemical synthesis allow defined manipulation of covalent protein modifications that have been difficult to study by conventional methods. Here we discuss how these new technologies are starting to reveal the biological consequences and regulation of histone methylation on the structured nucleosome core.

    5. Chemical Approaches for the Detection and Synthesis of Acetylated Proteins (pages 314–322)

      Dr. Yu-Ying Yang and Prof. Howard C. Hang

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000558

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      The prevalence and diversity of protein acetylation highlight the necessity of robust methods for detecting protein acetylation and producing homogeneously acetylated proteins to dissect their biological functions and regulation mechanisms.

  7. Full Papers

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    1. Xenoestrogens Regulate the Activity of Arginine Methyltransferases (pages 323–329)

      Dr. Donghang Cheng and Prof. Dr. Mark T. Bedford

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000522

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      Reports of CARM1 activity: When the expression of Flag-tagged PABP1 is induced in the presence of a CARM1 small molecule inhibitor, lower levels of PABP methylation are observed. This reduction in arginine methylation by CARM1 can be monitored with a methylation-specific PABP1 antibody (see scheme).

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      A Chemical Method for Labeling Lysine Methyltransferase Substrates (pages 330–334)

      Dr. Olivier Binda, Dr. Michael Boyce, Jason S. Rush, Krishnan K. Palaniappan, Dr. Carolyn R. Bertozzi and Dr. Or Gozani

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000433

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      Click art: The transfer of an alkyne moiety from an S-adenosylmethionine analogue (1) onto a lysine residue by the methyltransferase, KMT, allowed the tagging of the modified substrate for subsequent analysis by copper-catalyzed click chemistry, as demonstrated in the scheme.

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Reviews
    7. Minireviews
    8. Full Papers
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemBioChem 3/2011 (page 335)

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190003

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