ChemBioChem

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 3

February 11, 2011

Volume 12, Issue 3

Pages 337–491

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: A Two-Photon Turn-On Probe for Lipid Rafts with Minimum Internalization (ChemBioChem 3/2011) (page 337)

      Chang Su Lim, Hyung Joong Kim, Jun Han Lee, Dr. Yu Shun Tian, Dr. Chul Hoon Kim, Prof. Hwan Myung Kim, Prof. Taiha Joo and Prof. Bong Rae Cho

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190004

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      The cover picture shows the distribution of lipid rafts in a fresh hippocampal slice from three-day-old rat at a depth of 100 μm. The image was obtained with two-photon microscopy (TPM) by using a newly developed two-photon turn-on probe (SL2). TPM that utilizes two NIR photons for excitation has the advantage of visualizing the biological targets deep inside intact tissues with tightly focused emission. SL2, which has a sulfonate group in the head, has a greater tendency to be located in the plasma membrane than existing probes, and emits much stronger two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in the liquid-ordered than in the liquid-disordered domain, thereby allowing the direct visualization of the lipid rafts in live cells and deep inside intact tissues without internalization problems by simply collecting TPEF with TPM. For further information, see the paper by B. R. Cho et al. on p. 392 ff.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Implantation of Post-translational Tyrosylprotein Sulfation into a Prokaryotic Expression System (ChemBioChem 3/2011) (page 338)

      Lu-Yi Lu, Bo-Han Chen, Jennifer Yun-Shin Wu, Chen-Chu Wang, Da-Huang Chen and Prof. Yuh-Shyong Yang

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190005

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      The inside cover picture shows the initiation of post-translational protein sulfation, which is involved in a variety of biological events such as inflammation, signal pathways and virus infection. For details of how sulfated proteins were efficiently produced through co-expression of related enzymes and the protein target in a bacterial system see the communication by Y.-S. Yang et al. on p. 377 ff.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemBioChem 3/2011 (pages 339–346)

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190006

  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: ChemBioChem Has Come of Age (page 346)

      Peter Gölitz, Adrian Neal and Lisa Abel

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190007

      This article corrects:

      ChemBioChem Has Come of Age

      Vol. 12, Issue 1, 3–6, Article first published online: 30 DEC 2010

  5. Retraction

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
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    10. Communications
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Retraction: Development of Anionically Decorated 2-(ortho-Nitrophenyl)-Propyl-Caged Neurotransmitters for Photolysis in vitro and in vivo (page 346)

      Dr. Srinivas Kantevari, Dr. Judit K. Makara, Dr. Attila Losonczy, Dr. Tommaso Fellin, Prof. Philip G. Haydon, Dr. Jeffrey C. Magee and Prof. Graham C. R. Ellis-Davies

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000254

  6. News

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    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemBioChem 3/2011 (pages 350–352)

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190008

  7. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
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    10. Communications
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    1. Engineering Protein Switches: Sensors, Regulators, and Spare Parts for Biology and Biotechnology (pages 353–361)

      Dr. Misha V. Golynskiy, Dr. Melissa S. Koay, Dr. Jan L. Vinkenborg and Dr. Maarten Merkx

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000642

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      Switch protein switch! Proteins that switch between distinct conformational states are ideal for monitoring and controlling molecular processes in biological systems. We discuss new engineering concepts for the construction of protein switches that have the potential to be generally applicable and discuss them according to their mechanism of action.

  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
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    12. Book Reviews
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    1. An Enzymatic Route to Sunscreens (pages 363–365)

      Prof. Eric W. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000709

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      New spin on an old class: The biochemical pathway to shinorine, a typical mycosporine amino acid (MAA) sunscreen, was recently elucidated. Genes for MAA biosynthesis are widespread in diverse taxa, but are particularly common in eukaryotic and cyanobacterial phytoplankton. The biochemical pathway features novel twists on old enzyme classes.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
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    1. Universal Sensing by Transduction of Antibody Binding with Backscattering Interferometry (pages 367–370)

      Dr. Amanda Kussrow, Dr. Michael M. Baksh, Prof. Darryl J. Bornhop and Prof. M. G. Finn

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000671

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      All binding events induce a change in refractive index, and antibody–antigen interactions are no exception. We describe the use of backscattering interferometry to quantify antibody binding without labels and with high sensitivity. As a broad range of antibodies are available, this method represents a general way to selectively detect a wide variety of trace molecules in simple or complex mixtures.

    2. A Novel Organometallic ReI Complex with Favourable Properties for Bioimaging and Applicability in Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis (pages 371–376)

      Lukasz Raszeja, Dr. Abdelouahid Maghnouj, Prof. Dr. Stephan Hahn and Prof. Dr. Nils Metzler-Nolte

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000576

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      Imaging with metal complexes: The synthesis and characterization of a novel bis(phenanthridinylmethyl) (bpm) ligand and its rhenium tricarbonyl complexes are described. Moreover it is shown that the advantageous photophysical properties of these complexes could be exploited for application in cellular imaging experiments.

    3. Implantation of Post-translational Tyrosylprotein Sulfation into a Prokaryotic Expression System (pages 377–379)

      Lu-Yi Lu, Bo-Han Chen, Jennifer Yun-Shin Wu, Chen-Chu Wang, Da-Huang Chen and Prof. Yuh-Shyong Yang

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000540

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      Sulfation made easy: Syntheses of tyrosine-sulfated proteins were developed by coupling an in situ 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS)-generating system and tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) catalysis. High catalytic efficiency of TPST in vitro was demonstrated, and by using a similar strategy, sulfated proteins were produced in vivo through bacterial cultivation.

    4. Enzyme-Catalyzed Substrate Attachment to Phage Surfaces for the Selection of Catalytic Activities (pages 380–386)

      Murat Sunbul, Nyssa Emerson and Dr. Jun Yin

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000475

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      Catalysis-based phage selection: A phage selection method has been developed to allow the codisplay of enzymes and their substrate molecules on phage surface. Substrate turnover by phage-displayed enzymes affords product-attached phages that can be enriched by affinity selection. Such a selection method can be a useful platform for identifying desired enzymatic activities in a phage library.

    5. Dissecting Cell Signaling Pathways with Genetically Encoded 3-Iodo-L-tyrosine (pages 387–389)

      Akiko Hayashi, Dr. Nobumasa Hino, Dr. Takatsugu Kobayashi, Dr. Ryoichi Arai , Dr. Mikako Shirouzu, Prof. Shigeyuki Yokoyama  and Dr. Kensaku Sakamoto

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000665

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      Marking the proteome: A single amino acid residue in the proteome was labeled by mammalian genetic code expansion, which incorporated 3-iodotyrosine at a particular tyrosine phosphorylation site in cell-signaling pathways. Phosphorylation at the site was analyzed by an antibody specific for the tyrosine derivative.

    6. Internal and Global Protein Motion Assessed with a Fusion Construct and In-Cell NMR Spectroscopy (pages 390–391)

      Christopher O. Barnes, William B. Monteith and Prof. Gary J. Pielak

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000610

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      Motion study: We have examined a fusion protein comprising a globular (ubiquitin) and an intrinsically disordered (α-synuclein) component. The data show that internal motion determines the quality of in-cell NMR spectra. The disordered component exhibits a high-resolution spectrum, whereas the globular portion is only observed when the cells are lysed and diluted.

    7. A Two-Photon Turn-On Probe for Lipid Rafts with Minimum Internalization (pages 392–395)

      Chang Su Lim, Hyung Joong Kim, Jun Han Lee, Dr. Yu Shun Tian, Dr. Chul Hoon Kim, Prof. Hwan Myung Kim, Prof. Taiha Joo and Prof. Bong Rae Cho

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000609

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      Finding lipid rafts: We report a two-photon turn-on probe (SL2) that emits strong two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in lipid rafts and can detect the lipid rafts in live cells and living tissues by two-photon microscopy without any internalization problems.

    8. Rebeccamycin and Staurosporine Biosynthesis: Insight into the Mechanisms of the Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenases RebC and StaC (pages 396–400)

      Katherine Groom, Dr. Anupam Bhattacharya  and Prof. David L. Zechel

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000580

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      Once or twice? RebC and StaC are flavin-dependent monooxygenases that occupy a key branch point in the biosynthesis of the indolocarbazoles rebeccamycin and staurosporine, respectively. A mere two substitutions in the active site of RebC was found to confer StaC reactivity.

    9. Cyclic RGD β-Lactam Peptidomimetics Induce Differential Gene Expression in Human Endothelial Cells (pages 401–405)

      Prof. Dr. Jesus M. Aizpurua, Prof. Dr. José Ignacio Ganboa, Prof. Dr. Claudio Palomo, Dr. Iraida Loinaz, Dr. Joseba Oyarbide, Xabier Fernandez, Dr. Eva Balentová, Dr. Raluca M. Fratila, Dr. Azucena Jiménez, Dr. José Ignacio Miranda, Dr. Antonio Laso, Dr. Silvia Ávila and Dr. José Luis Castrillo

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000572

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      RGD peptidomimetics touch DNA: A few RGD cyclic peptidomimetics, each incorporating a densely substituted β-lactam moiety, were prepared, and their effect on extracellular adhesion and intracellular gene regulation through αVβ3 integrin was studied in human endothelial cells (HUVECs). Surprisingly, the cyclic tetrapeptide with a deleted glycine residue and its parent RGD peptidomimetic displayed practically opposite angiogenic gene-regulation activity.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Preview
    1. Bacterial Inclusion Bodies of Alzheimer's Disease β-Amyloid Peptides Can Be Employed To Study Native-Like Aggregation Intermediate States (pages 407–423)

      Muralidhar Dasari, Alba Espargaro, Dr. Raimon Sabate, Dr. Juan Miguel Lopez del Amo, Uwe Fink, Gerlinde Grelle, Dr. Jan Bieschke, Prof. Salvador Ventura and Prof. Bernd Reif

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000602

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      Amyloid aggregation intermediates:E. coli inclusion bodies formed by the Alzheimer's disease β-amyloid peptides Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 behave structurally like amyloid aggregation intermediates and offer the possibility of studying amyloids in a native-like, cellular environment.

    2. A G-Quadruplex Aptamer Inhibits the Phosphatase Activity of Oncogenic Protein Shp2 in vitro (pages 424–430)

      Jia Hu, Jie Wu, Cong Li, Ling Zhu, Dr. Wei Yun Zhang, Guiping Kong, Prof. Zhongxian Lu and Prof. Chaoyong James Yang

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000470

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      Probing Shp2: We have identified two classes of ssDNA aptamers that selectively bind to Shp2. Structural studies of the most abundant sequence in the enriched library, HJ24, revealed a parallel G-quadruplex as the core binding domain. This aptamer was found to inhibit Shp2 phosphatase, an effect that was readily reversed by using the cDNA of HJ24.

    3. Cleavage of Functionalized DNA Containing 5-Modified Pyrimidines by Type II Restriction Endonucleases (pages 431–438)

      Hana Macíčková-Cahová, Dr. Radek Pohl and Prof. Dr. Michal Hocek

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000644

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      Saved from the chop: The cleavage of pyrimidine-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases is reported. Some enzymes tolerate the presence of 5-substituted uracil components, but none of them tolerates any 5-modified cytosine component. There is potential for using restriction cleavage to manipulate base-modified DNA sequences for the prospective incorporation of modified sequences into long DNA biomolecules.

    4. Characterization of the Biosynthesis Gene Cluster for Alkyl-O-Dihydrogeranyl-Methoxyhydroquinones in Actinoplanes missouriensis (pages 439–448)

      M. Takayoshi Awakawa, Dr. Nobuyuki Fujita, Prof. Masayuki Hayakawa, Prof. Yasuo Ohnishi and Prof. Sueharu Horinouchi

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000628

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      The biosynthesis pathway for a novel phenolic lipid 6-alkyl-4-O-dihydrogeranyl-2-methoxyhydroquinone in a rare actinomycete Actinoplanes missouriensis has been revealed. Alkylresorcinols produced by a type III polyketide synthase AgqA are successively modified by AgqB, AgqC, AgqD and a prenyl reductase.

    5. Neuronal Differentiation of C17.2 Neural Stem Cells Induced by a Natural Flavonoid, Baicalin (pages 449–456)

      Dr. Ming Li, Dr. Kam-Sze Tsang, Sze-Ting Choi, Prof. Karen Li, Prof. Pang-Chui Shaw and Prof. Kwok-Fai Lau

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000570

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      Neuroregeneration: Baicalin was identified as a potent differentiation-inducing compound in a screening platform based on C17.2 neural stem cells. This natural flavonoid significantly increases Erk1/2-activation-mediated neuronal differentiation. Our findings provide a scientific basis for the therapeutic potential of baicalin for neuroregeneration.

    6. Synthesis, Evaluation, and Mechanism of N,N,N-Trimethyl-D-glucosamine-(1[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]4)-chitooligosaccharides as Selective Inhibitors of Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 20 β-N-Acetyl-D-hexosaminidases (pages 457–467)

      You Yang, Tian Liu, Yongliang Yang, Qingyue Wu, Prof. Qing Yang  and Prof. Biao Yu

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000561

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      Cutting out sugar: TMG-chitotriomycin (shown) is a natural selective inhibitor against bacterial and insect β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidases. We have synthesized a series of analogues containing one to four GlcNAc units and found TMG-(GlcNAc)2 to be as active as TMG-chitotriomycin. The selective inhibition mechanism of TMG-chitotriomycin was also explained.

    7. NMR Studies of DOXP Reductoisomerase and its Inhibitor Complex (pages 468–476)

      Nadine E. Englert, Dr. Christian Richter, Priv. Doz. Dr. Jochen Wiesner, Dr. Martin Hintz, Priv. Doz. Dr. Hassan Jomaa and Prof. Dr. Harald Schwalbe

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000465

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      Complexed structure: DOXP reductoisomerase, an enzyme of the isoprenoid biosysthesis pathway, is found in many pathogenic species but not in humans. It is thus a promising target for novel drug development. We report important structural features revealed by NMR of this relatively large enzyme obtained in complex with NADPH and its inhibitory analogues

    8. Identification of a Napsamycin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster by Genome Mining (pages 477–487)

      Leonard Kaysser , Xiaoyu Tang , Emmanuel Wemakor, Katharina Sedding, Susanne Hennig, Stefanie Siebenberg and Dr. Bertolt Gust

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000460

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      An unusual cluster: A napsamycin biosynthetic gene cluster has been identified by using a genome mining approach. Analysis of the cluster revealed an unusual non-ribosomal peptide biosynthetic machinery consisting mostly of discrete single- or bi-domain proteins. Heterologous expression led to the production of napsamycin C and mureidomycins A and B.

  11. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Preview
    1. Enzyme Technologies: Metagenomics, Evolution, Biocatalysis and Biosynthesis. Edited by Wu-Kuang Yeh, Hsiu-Chiung Yang and James R. McCarthy. (pages 488–489)

      Karl-Heinz Maurer

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000784

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      Wiley, Hoboken 2010, xi+368 pp., hardcover $ 125.00.—ISBN 978-0-470-28624-1

    2. Encyclopedia of Marine Natural Products. By Jean-Michel Kornprobst. (pages 489–490)

      Georg Pohnert

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201000764

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      Wiley–Blackwell, Oxford 2010, 1594 pp. (3 vols), hardcover € 599.00.—ISBN 978-3-527-32703-4

  12. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Retraction
    7. News
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemBioChem 4/2011 (page 491)

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201190009

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