ChemBioChem

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 2

January 23, 2012

Volume 13, Issue 2

Pages 169–319

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Live-Cell dSTORM of Cellular DNA Based on Direct DNA Labeling (ChemBioChem 2/2012) (page 169)

      Alexander Benke and Prof. Suliana Manley

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201290000

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows images of the nucleus in a living U2OS cell. The right-hand image shows continuous fibers of DNA labeled with Picogreen and was acquired using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). For comparison, the diffraction-limited wide-field image is shown on the left-hand side. Picogreen is a commercially available, DNA-specific fluorophore that is suitable for single-molecule observations. On p. 298 ff., A. Benke and S. Manley describe the use of live-cell dSTORM imaging to visualize nuclear and mitochondrial Picogreen-labeled DNA at super-resolution. As well as chromatin fibers, mitochondrial nucleolids could be imaged at a resolution of 70 nm. They also demonstrate time-lapse dSTORM imaging which will allow the dynamics of chromatin organization to be investigated at an unprecedented level.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemBioChem 2/2012 (pages 171–176)

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201290001

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigenda: Synthesis and Characterization of Oriented Glyco-Capturing Macroligand (page 176)

      Srinivas Chalagalla, Yanyang Wang, Dale Ray, Prof. Xiangqun Zeng and Prof. Xue-Long Sun

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100765

      This article corrects:

      Synthesis and Characterization of Oriented Glyco-Capturing Macroligand

      Vol. 11, Issue 14, 2018–2025, Article first published online: 3 SEP 2010

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemBioChem 2/2012 (pages 180–182)

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201290002

  5. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. A New Chemical Handle for Protein AMPylation at the Host–Pathogen Interface (pages 183–185)

      Dr. Malgorzata Broncel, Dr. Remigiusz A. Serwa and Dr. Edward W. Tate

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100743

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tagging protein AMPylation: A new chemical reporter for AMPylation, recently identified as a key post-translational modification during bacterial infection, is a robust tool for detecting and identifying AMPylated proteins in vitro.

    2. Engineered Unnatural Animals: Tools for Multicellular Biochemistry (pages 186–188)

      Prof. Ryan A. Mehl

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100674

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The tools at our disposal define the scientific problems we can solve. Few tools exist for studying and altering the components inside a living animal. The incorporation of unnatural amino acids site-specifically into proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans greatly expands the toolbox currently available to biologists allowing for investigation of inter- and intracellular interactions in an organismal context.

    3. The Thorny Way to the Mechanism of Ribosomal Peptide-Bond Formation (pages 189–192)

      Dr. Markus Pech and Prof. Dr. Dr. Knud H. Nierhaus

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100660

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Per aspera ad astra: Kinetic isotope effects have indicated a new and comprehensive picture of the central ribosomal enzymatic activity, peptide-bond formation. To this end, isotopes were incorporated in the positions highlighted in red.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. Multifunctions of MelB, a Fungal Tyrosinase from Aspergillus oryzae (pages 193–201)

      Dr. Nobutaka Fujieda, Michiaki Murata, Shintaro Yabuta, Takuya Ikeda, Dr. Chizu Shimokawa, Dr. Yukihiro Nakamura, Dr. Yoji Hata and Prof. Shinobu Itoh

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100609

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Proteolytic functional change: the melB gene product (melB tyrosinase) from Aspergillus oryzae can function as dioxygen carrier, monooxygenase, and oxidase. The cleavage of the C-terminal domain by proteolytic treatment changes the function of the tyrosinase from dioxygen carrier to catechol oxidase and phenol monooxygenase.

    2. Terpenoids are Widespread in Actinomycetes: A Correlation of Secondary Metabolism and Genome Data (pages 202–214)

      Christian A. Citron, Julia Gleitzmann, Gianfranco Laurenzano, Dr. Rüdiger Pukall and Dr. Jeroen S. Dickschat

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100641

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The volatiles from 35 bacteria with sequenced genomes, most of them actinomycetes, have been analysed. In the genomes of 34 species, one or several sesquiterpene cyclase homologues were encoded. The diversity of volatile terpenes emitted by these strains was correlated to the available genetic information, giving interesting new insights into bacterial terpene biosynthesis.

    3. Towards Quantitative Computer-Aided Studies of Enzymatic Enantioselectivity: The Case of Candida antarctica Lipase A (pages 215–223)

      Maria P. Frushicheva and Prof. Dr. Arieh Warshel

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100600

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The prospect for quantitative computer-aided design of enantioselective enzymes was explored by simulating the enzyme hydrolysis of the R and S enantiomers of an ester. Using the empirical valence bond method in a quantitative screening for enantioselectivity and evaluating kcat and kcat/KM of the stereoisomers, we found that extensive sampling was essential to obtaining converging results.

    4. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of Three Type II PKS Gene Clusters from Streptomyces bottropensis (pages 224–230)

      Xiaohui Yan, Katharina Probst, Dr. Anton Linnenbrink, Dr. Moritz Arnold, Dr. Thomas Paululat, Prof. Dr. Axel Zeeck and Prof. Dr. Andreas Bechthold

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100574

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clusters of color: Three type II PKS gene clusters (msn, mec, and rsl) in Streptomyces bottropensis were screened. Heterologous expression of the msn and rsl clusters in Streptomyces albus led to the production of didesmethylmensacarcin (DDMM), and of rishirilide A and B, respectively. No product was isolated from mec (a putative spore pigment biosynthesis gene cluster).

    5. Interaction of a Tat Substrate and a Tat Signal Peptide with Thylakoid Lipids at the Air–Water Interface (pages 231–239)

      Dr. Andreas Kerth, Tina Brehmer, Dr. Annette Meister, Dr. Peter Hanner, Dr. Mario Jakob, Prof. Dr. Ralf Bernd Klösgen and Prof. Dr. Alfred Blume

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100458

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We investigated the initial states of the interaction of a Tat substrate with thylakoid lipid monolayers at the air–water interface by using monolayer techniques combined with infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). We used the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a substrate and found that the signal peptide is essential for the interaction of the model substrate with lipid monolayers.

    6. Incorporation of Manganese Complexes into Xylanase: New Artificial Metalloenzymes for Enantioselective Epoxidation (pages 240–251)

      Mathieu Allard, Prof. Claude Dupont, Victor Muñoz Robles, Prof. Nicolas Doucet, Prof. Agustí Lledós, Dr. Jean-Didier Maréchal, Dr. Agathe Urvoas, Prof. Jean-Pierre Mahy and Dr. Rémy Ricoux

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100659

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enantioselective epoxidation: An artificial metalloenzyme obtained by noncovalent insertion of MnIII-meso-tetrakis(para-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin Mn(TpCPP) into xylanase 10A from Streptomyces lividans as a host protein was able to catalyse the oxidation of para-methoxystyrene by KHSO5 with a 16 % yield and the best enantioselectivity (80 % in favour of the R isomer) ever reported for an artificial metalloenzyme.

    7. Functionalization of Oxidases with Peroxidase Activity Creates Oxiperoxidases: A New Breed of Hybrid Enzyme Capable of Cascade Chemistry (pages 252–258)

      Remko T. Winter, Tomas E. van den Berg, Dana I. Colpa, Dr. Edwin van Bloois and Prof. Dr. Marco W. Fraaije

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100639

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two in one: We present the merging of two complementary enzyme activities in a single protein backbone to create a new breed of hybrid enzyme: an oxiperoxidase. Such hybrid enzymes have potential for application in biosensors and in high-throughput screening assays.

    8. Arginine Mimetics Using α-Guanidino Acids: Introduction of Functional Groups and Stereochemistry Adjacent to Recognition Guanidiniums in Peptides (pages 259–270)

      Dr. Shalini Balakrishnan, Michael J. Scheuermann and Prof. Dr. Neal J. Zondlo

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100638

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positive role models: Arginine residues display guanidinium groups at the end of a hydrocarbon side chain. In this work, peptides were stereospecifically synthesized to contain α-substituted guanidiniums. Affinity and specificity in SH3 domain protein–protein interactions were modulated using α-guanidino acid arginine mimetics.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Phosphorylation as a Tool To Modulate Aggregation Propensity and To Predict Fibril Architecture (pages 271–281)

      Dr. Nathalie M. Valette, Prof. Sheena E. Radford, Dr. Sarah A. Harris and Dr. Stuart L. Warriner

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100607

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shape shifters: Analysis of the aggregation propensity of a range of phosphorylated analogues of a peptide from β2-microglobulin (see figure) revealed sequence specific effects, which could be rationalised by using molecular dynamics simulations to give new insights into fibril morphology.

    10. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Fluorescent Non-Peptidic Cholecystokinin-B/Gastrin Receptor Specific Antagonist for Cancer Cell Imaging (pages 282–292)

      Dr. Saroj Kumari, Dr. Joyita Chowdhury, Dr. Anil K. Mishra, Dr. Sudhir Chandna, Prof. Daman Saluja and Dr. Madhu Chopra

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100593

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A non-peptidic, high-affinity fluorescent CCK-B/gastrin receptor antagonist has been synthesized and characterized. The results suggest that the modified antagonist tightly binds to the CCK-B/gastrin receptor, thus representing a potential candidate for imaging the receptor in overexpressing cells or tissues.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A General Chemical Ligation Approach Towards Isopeptide-Linked Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-Like Assay Reagents (pages 293–297)

      Dr. Paul P. Geurink, Dr. Farid El Oualid, Anika Jonker, Dharjath S. Hameed and Dr. Huib Ovaa

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100706

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thiolysine-mediated chemical ligation has generated fluorescence polarisation assay reagents based on isopeptide-linked ubiquitin-like protein conjugates. These have been used to monitor the activity of ubiquitin(-like) proteases. Thus, it is now possible to generate assay reagents that contain substrate-derived elements around the isopeptide linkage, with no practical limitation.

    2. Live-Cell dSTORM of Cellular DNA Based on Direct DNA Labeling (pages 298–301)

      Alexander Benke and Prof. Suliana Manley

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100679

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We have implemented the super-resolution method of direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to image nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in living cells. We also demonstrate time-lapse imaging, all using a dye that associates directly with cellular DNA: the commercially available dye Picogreen (see figure).

    3. The Natural Product Betulinic Acid Inhibits C/EBP Family Transcription Factors (pages 302–307)

      Angela Hollis, Bianca Sperl, Dr. Martin Gräber and Prof. Dr. Thorsten Berg

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100652

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nature does it: Small-molecule inhibitors of transcription factors are highly sought after, but only a limited number are known to date. Here, we report the pentacyclic triterpenoid betulinic acid as a pan-specific inhibitor of the C/EBP transcription factor family, proteins that play prominent roles in adipogenesis and tumorigenesis.

    4. Direct Observation of Metabolic Differences in Living Escherichia Coli Strains K-12 and BL21 (pages 308–310)

      Dr. Sebastian Meier, Dr. Pernille R. Jensen and Prof. Jens Ø. Duus

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100654

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct observation of metabolism on a timescale of seconds shows altered usage, due to genomic differences, of one specific reaction in living E. coli K-12 and BL21. The resulting phenotypic data vary strongly when directly detecting biochemical reactions at work.

    5. Improvement of RNAi Activity and Strand Selectivity of RISC Formation by Modified siRNA Involving Intercalators near 5′ Termini (pages 311–315)

      Hiroshi Ito, Masaaki Urushihara, Prof. Dr. Xingguo Liang and Prof. Dr. Hiroyuki Asanuma

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100570

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      RISC avoidance: By introducing an intercalator such as azobenzene into the 5′-end of the sense strand at a D-threoninol linker, RNAi activity was greatly improved. This enhancement of RNAi activity was attributed to selective loading of the antisense strand into RISC and the suppression of RISC assembly with the modified sense strand.

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Highlights
    7. Full Papers
    8. Communications
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemBioChem 3/2012 (page 319)

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201290003

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION