ChemBioChem

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 3

February 11, 2013

Volume 14, Issue 3

Pages 269–398

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Catch-and-Release Probes Applied to Semi-Intact Cells Reveal Ubiquitin-Specific Protease Expression in Chlamydia trachomatis Infection (ChemBioChem 3/2013) (page 269)

      Dr. Jasper H. L. Claessen, Dr. Martin D. Witte, Dr. Nicholas C. Yoder, Angela Y. Zhu, Eric Spooner and Prof. Dr. Hidde L. Ploegh

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201390004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows the delivery of a novel catch-and-release ubiquitin probe to cells infected with Chlamydia trachomatis. Protein ubiquitylation serves as a versatile signal involved in all areas of cell biology, and is controlled by a class of de-ubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). In the article on p. 343 ff, H. L. Ploegh et al. report an activity-based probe that covalently binds to DUBs. Sortase-mediated chemistry allowed three different cleavable linker handles to be installed on the probe, and this resulted in the efficient retrieval of bound protein. As the probe is cell impermeable, it was delivered to the cytosol of cells permeabilized with the pore-forming toxin perfringolysin O. With this technique, the authors were able to identify great numbers of DUBs at endogenous expression level. When the technique was applied to cells infected with C. trachomatis, the authors observed expression of different host DUBs and identified two DUBs expressed by the pathogen itself. The cover was designed by Tom DiCesare (Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research).

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Beetles Do It Differently: Two Stereodivergent Cyclisation Modes in Iridoid-Producing Leaf-Beetle Larvae (ChemBioChem 3/2013) (page 270)

      Dr. Maritta Kunert, Peter Rahfeld, Dr. Kamel H. Shaker, Dr. Bernd Schneider, Anja David, Prof. Dr. Konrad Dettner, Prof. Dr. Jacques M. Pasteels and Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Boland

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201390005

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      The inside cover picture shows a proposed mechanism for the biosynthesis of chrysomelidial in leaf-beetle larvae. The sequence implies the formation of a dienamine intermediate that is “transoid” in P. cochleariae and “cisoid” in G. viridula. For further details see the paper by W. Boland et al. on p. 353 ff. We thank Jana Becher for the arrangement of the inside cover.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
  4. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Flexibility and Reactivity in Promiscuous Enzymes (pages 285–292)

      Dr. Pietro Gatti-Lafranconi and Dr. Florian Hollfelder

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200628

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      Best of both worlds: The interplay of active site reactivity and the dynamic character of proteins allows enzymes to be promiscuous and—sometimes—remarkably efficient at the same time. This review analyses the roles structural flexibility and chemical reactivity play in the catalytic mechanism of selected enzymes.

  5. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Innovation and Originality in the Strategies Developed by Bacteria To Get Access to Iron (pages 293–294)

      Dr. Isabelle J. Schalk

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200738

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      Pumping iron: Raymond's group has identified and described the molecular details of an ABC transporter. Together with a binding protein at the cell surface, it is able to extract an unstable form of ferricitrate.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Biology-Oriented Synthesis of a Tetrahydroisoquinoline-Based Compound Collection Targeting Microtubule Polymerization (pages 295–300)

      Dr. Tobias J. Zimmermann, Dr. Sayantani Roy, Nancy E. Martinez, Dr. Slava Ziegler, Dr. Christian Hedberg and Prof. Dr. Herbert Waldmann

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200711

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      In the third place: Inspired by the tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) alkaloid noscapine, inhibitors of tubulin polymerization that bind to a site different from the colchicine and the vinca alkaloid binding sites have been synthesized. One compound is more potent than noscapine in HeLa cells and can overcome resistance to chemotherapeutics.

    2. Characterization of the Bafilomycin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster from Streptomyces lohii (pages 301–306)

      Dr. Wei Zhang, Dr. Jeffrey L. Fortman, Dr. Jacob C. Carlson, Dr. Jinyong Yan, Yi Liu, Fali Bai, Dr. Wenna Guan, Dr. Junyong Jia, Prof. Teatulohi Matainaho, Prof. David H. Sherman and Prof. Shengying Li

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200743

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      New hope for old bones: The plecomacrolide bafilomycin has been explored for decades as an anti-osteoporotic. However, its structural complexity has limited the synthesis of analogues. The cloning of the bafilomycin biosynthetic gene cluster from the environmental isolate Streptomyces lohii opens the door to the production of new analogues through bioengineering.

    3. Small-Molecule-Mediated Axonal Branching in Caenorhabditis elegans (pages 307–310)

      Katherine Zlotkowski, Prof. Jon Pierce-Shimomura and Prof. Dionicio Siegel

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200712

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      An in vivo system for monitoring small-molecule-mediated neuronal branching has been developed by using C. elegans. Growth-promoting compounds can be detected by visual inspection of GFPlabeled cholinergic neurons, as axonal branching occurs following treatment with neurotrophic agents. Investigation of the structure–activity relationship of the neurotrophic natural product clovanemagnolol (1) led us to a comparable chemically edited derivative.

    4. Genetic Dissection of Sesquiterpene Biosynthesis by Fusarium fujikuroi (pages 311–315)

      Nelson L. Brock, Kathleen Huss, Prof. Dr. Bettina Tudzynski and Dr. Jeroen S. Dickschat

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200695

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      A treasure trove of terpenes: The products of two fungal sesquiterpene synthases from the rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi were identified by gene-knockout experiments, genetic engineering of the fungus for production optimization, isolation of the sesquiterpenes, and structure elucidation by spectroscopic methods.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Identification and Characterization of Bacterial Diterpene Cyclases that Synthesize the Cembrane Skeleton (pages 316–321)

      Ayuko Meguro, Dr. Takeo Tomita, Prof. Makoto Nishiyama and Prof. Tomohisa Kuzuyama

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200651

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      Digging up skeletons: We report the identification and the functional characterization of two terpene cyclases (DtcycA and DtcycB) that were mined from the genome of Streptomyces sp. SANK 60404. DtcycA and DtcycB are novel bacterial diterpene cyclases for the synthesis of the cembrane skeleton.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Identification and Characterization of Bacterial Diterpene Cyclases that Synthesize the Cembrane Skeleton

      Vol. 15, Issue 7, 913, Version of Record online: 28 APR 2014

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Molecular Basis for Sequence-Dependent Induced DNA Bending (pages 323–331)

      Dr. Michael Rettig, Prof. Markus W. Germann, Shuo Wang and Prof. W. David Wilson

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200706

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ligand-induced DNA bending: In contrast to the situation for A-tract DNA, binding of netropsin results in the bending of alternating AT DNA towards the minor groove. This was shown by NMR, PAGE mobility, and rMD studies.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Using a Fragment-Based Approach To Target Protein–Protein Interactions (pages 332–342)

      Dr. Duncan E. Scott, Dr. Matthias T. Ehebauer, Dr. Tara Pukala, Dr. May Marsh, Prof. Sir Tom L. Blundell, Prof. Ashok R. Venkitaraman, Prof. Chris Abell and Dr. Marko Hyvönen

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200521

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      Divide and conquer: Using a surrogate protein of Rad51, we created a fragment screening methodology to identify and biophysically validate fragments that bind in a small surface pocket involved in the interaction with the tumour suppressor BRCA2. A range of biophysical techniques including thermal shift, STD NMR spectroscopy, ITC and X-ray crystallography was employed.

    3. Catch-and-Release Probes Applied to Semi-Intact Cells Reveal Ubiquitin-Specific Protease Expression in Chlamydia trachomatis Infection (pages 343–352)

      Dr. Jasper H. L. Claessen, Dr. Martin D. Witte, Dr. Nicholas C. Yoder, Angela Y. Zhu, Eric Spooner and Prof. Dr. Hidde L. Ploegh

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200701

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lifting the cloak: Equipping activity-based probes for deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) with catch-and-release handles and subsequent delivery of these probes to the cytosol of semi-intact cells allows the study of deubiquitylating enzymes under conditions as close to physiological as possible. Using these conditions, we demonstrated that the second chlamydial DUB is expressed during the course of infection.

    4. Beetles Do It Differently: Two Stereodivergent Cyclisation Modes in Iridoid-Producing Leaf-Beetle Larvae (pages 353–360)

      Dr. Maritta Kunert, Peter Rahfeld, Dr. Kamel H. Shaker, Dr. Bernd Schneider, Anja David, Prof. Dr. Konrad Dettner, Prof. Dr. Jacques M. Pasteels and Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Boland

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200689

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Defensive circles: Leaf-beetle larvae synthesise the iridoid monoterpene chrysomelidial as a defensive compound. Feeding experiments with the deuterated precursor [2H5]8-hydroxygeraniol indicated two stereodivergent cyclisation modes towards chrysomelidial. To study the influence of the cyclisation mode on the stereochemistry, the configurations of chrysomelidials from seven species of leaf-beetle larvae were determined.

    5. De Novo Biosynthesis of Sexual Pheromone in the Labial Gland of Bumblebee Males (pages 361–371)

      Petr Žáček, Darina Prchalová-Horňáková, Dr. Richard Tykva, Dr. Jiří Kindl, Dr. Heiko Vogel, Dr. Aleš Svatoš, Dr. Iva Pichová and Dr. Irena Valterová

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200684

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      The birds and the bumblebees: The main components of the sexual pheromones of male bumblebees of the species Bombus terrestris and Bombus lucorum are synthesized from acetate precursors in the cephalic part of the labial gland.

    6. Caged CO2 for the Direct Observation of CO2-Consuming Reactions (pages 372–380)

      Katharina Lommel, Dr. Gabriela Schäfer, Konstantin Grenader, Christoph Ruland, Prof. Dr. Andreas Terfort, Prof. Dr. Werner Mäntele and Dr. Georg Wille

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200659

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      How to see CO2 too: Photodecarboxylation of 3-nitrophenyl acetic acid has been used to release CO2 in aqueous thin-layer samples. CO2 and its reactions can then be measured directly and conveniently by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    7. Biotinylated Phosphoproteins from Kinase-Catalyzed Biotinylation are Stable to Phosphatases: Implications for Phosphoproteomics (pages 381–387)

      Chamara Senevirathne and Prof. Mary Kay H. Pflum

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200626

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      A durable tag: The biotinylated phosphoprotein products of kinase-catalyzed ATP-biotin labeling were stable to phosphatases, suggesting that kinase-catalyzed biotinylation is well suited for phosphoproteomics applications.

    8. Isolation and Characterisation of a Ferrirhodin Synthetase Gene from the Sugarcane Pathogen Fusarium sacchari (pages 388–394)

      Dr. Asifa Munawar, Dr. James W. Marshall, Prof. Russell J. Cox, Dr. Andy M. Bailey and Dr. Colin M. Lazarus

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200587

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heterologous siderophore synthesis: Fungi use siderophores for the acquisition and storage of iron. A gene isolated from the sugar-cane pathogen Fusarium sacchari has features of a ferrichrome-type siderophore synthetase; by reassembling and expressing it in Aspergillus oryzae, we showed that it encodes the nonribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for the synthesis of ferrirhodin (1)

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Methods in Molecular Biology 858: DNA Barcodes: Methods and Protocols. Edited by W. John Kress and David L. Erikson. (page 395)

      Natasha de Vere

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300015

      Humana Press, Totowa 2012, XV+470 pp., hardcover, $ 139.00.—ISBN 978-1-61779-590-9

    2. Recent Developments in Biomolecular NMR. Edited by Marius Clore and Jennifer Potts. (pages 395–396)

      Claudio Luchinat

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300023

      RSC, Cambridge 2012, xv+347 pp., hardcover, £ 153.99.—ISBN 978-1-84973-120-1

    3. Methods in Molecular Biology 872: In Vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent Proteins: Methods and Protocols. Edited by Robert M. Hoffman. (pages 396–398)

      May Morris

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200791

      Humana Press, Totowa 2012, XIII+269 pp., hardcover, $ 119.00.—ISBN 978-1-61779-796-5

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