ChemBioChem

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 7

May 10, 2013

Volume 14, Issue 7

Pages 773–898

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: A TR-FRET-Based Functional Assay for Screening Activators of CARM1 (ChemBioChem 7/2013) (page 773)

      Hao Zeng, Dr. Jiacai Wu, Prof. Dr. Mark T. Bedford, Prof. Dr. Gianluca Sbardella, Prof. Dr. F. Michael Hoffmann, Dr. Kun Bi and Prof. Dr. Wei Xu

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201390020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows a TR-FRET-based functional assay for screening small-molecule modulators of co-activator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), based on its methylation of PABP1. The formation of the ternary complex (Me-GFP-PABP1, Me-PABP1 Ab, and Tb-2nd Ab) enables time-resolved detection of the long-lifetime terbium (Tb)-to-GFP FRET signal. Light at 340 nm is used to excite Tb, which emits at 495 nm. The proximity of the donor Tb to the acceptor GFP results in energy transfer from Tb to GFP, and this induces the specific FRET signal at 520 nm. On p. 827 ff., W. Xu et al. describe the development and optimization of the homogenous Me-GFP-PABP1-based TR-FRET assay for monitoring the expression and enzymatic activity of CARM1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells. The assay has been optimized for high-throughput screening to identify CARM1 allosteric activators. More importantly, this methodology has the potential to be extended to other protein arginine methyltransferases through the development of appropriate substrate–GFP fusion proteins and methylation-site-specific antibodies.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Configurational Assignment of Secondary Hydroxyl Groups and Methyl Branches in Polyketide Natural Products through Bioinformatic Analysis of the Ketoreductase Domain (ChemBioChem 7/2013) (page 774)

      Andreas Kitsche and Prof. Dr. Markus Kalesse

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201390021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover picture shows a multiple sequence alignment based on amino acid sequences of ketoreductases. The multiple sequence alignment was used to fit a profile hidden Markov model to predict the configuration of secondary alcohols and α-methyl branches of modular polyketides. For further details see the paper by A. Kitsche and M. Kalesse on p. 851 ff.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
    1. Masthead: ChemBioChem 7/2013 (page 783)

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201390023

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
    1. Fluorescent Amino Acids: Modular Building Blocks for the Assembly of New Tools for Chemical Biology (pages 788–799)

      Dr. Andrew T. Krueger and Prof. Dr. Barbara Imperiali

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300079

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In living color: The ubiquity of peptide–protein and protein–protein interactions in complex biological processes has made them important targets for fluorescence labeling. This review describes recent advances in design, properties, and applications in the area of fluorescent amino acids (FlAAs).

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
    1. Nucleobase Protection Strategy for Gene Cloning and Expression (pages 801–804)

      Pavel Kielkowski, Nelson L. Brock, Dr. Jeroen S. Dickschat and Prof. Dr. Michal Hocek

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Protecting group chemistry meets molecular biology: Chemically modified dATP carrying a bulky triethylsilylethynyl group was used in a PCR-based synthesis of a gene internally protected against cleavage by restriction endonucleases. The unmodified flanking regions were cleaved for cloning into a plasmid which was replicated by E. coli, and used for protein production.

    2. A Click-and-Release Pyrrolysine Analogue (pages 805–808)

      Dr. Marianne M. Lee, Dr. Tomasz Fekner, Tsz-Ho Tang, Lin Wang, Aurora Ho-Yin Chan, Prof. Pang-Hung Hsu, Prof. Shannon W. Au and Prof. Michael K. Chan

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300124

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      What's the catch? A pyrrolysine analogue bearing a terminal alkyne and an ester functionality can be incorporated into recombinant proteins and render them amenable to capture by the click reaction and subsequent release through ester hydrolysis. The utility of this pyrrolysine-inspired technology is demonstrated for the identification of SUMOylation sites.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Making Ends Meet: Chemically Mediated Circularization of Recombinant Proteins (pages 809–812)

      Dr. Ben Cowper, Prof. Dr. David J. Craik and Dr. Derek Macmillan

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300105

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A selective N[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]S acyl transfer reaction facilitates semi-synthesis of the plant cyclotide kalata B1 from a linear precursor peptide of bacterial origin, through simple appendage of N-terminal cysteine and a thiol-labile C-terminal Gly-Cys motif. This constitutes the first synthesis of a ribosomally derived circular miniprotein, without recourse to protein splicing elements.

    4. An in Vivo Tagging Method Reveals that Ras Undergoes Sustained Activation upon Transglutaminase-Mediated Protein Serotonylation (pages 813–817)

      Jason Ching-Yao Lin, Dr. Chi-Chi Chou, Dr. Shijay Gao, Shang-Chuen Wu, Prof. Kay-Hooi Khoo and Prof. Chun-Hung Lin

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Don't interrupt! Protein serotonylation has been implicated in living cells, yet its role remains poorly defined because of the lack of characterization tools. We synthesized a serotonin derivative to enable selective tagging of serotonylation and to investigate its effect on Ras; the latter displayed undisrupted interaction with Raf-1 at the Ras binding domain.

    5. Selective Isotope Labelling of Leucine Residues by Using α-Ketoacid Precursor Compounds (pages 818–821)

      Dr. Roman J. Lichtenecker, Dr. Nicolas Coudevylle, Prof. Dr. Robert Konrat and Prof. Dr. Walther Schmid

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200737

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      You can have one without the other: A new metabolic precursor compound can selectively introduce 13C and 2H patterns at leucine residues in proteins in cell-based expression systems without interfering with valine metabolism. The protocol provides selectively labelled macromolecules well suited for probing structure and dynamics in high-molecular-weight proteins by NMR spectroscopy.

    6. Identification of Novel Sesterterpene/Triterpene Synthase from Bacillus clausii (pages 822–825)

      Prof. Dr. Tsutomu Sato, Hiroaki Yamaga, Shoji Kashima, Yusuke Murata, Prof. Dr. Tetsuro Shinada, Dr. Chiaki Nakano and Prof. Tsutomu Hoshino

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Basic enzyme: The tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue from the alkalophilic Bacillus clausii catalyses conversions of a geranylfarnesyl diphosphate and a hexaprenyl diphosphate into novel head-to-tail acyclic sesterterpene and triterpene. Tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologues represent a new family of terpene synthases that form not only sesquarterpene but also sesterterpene and triterpene.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
    1. A TR-FRET-Based Functional Assay for Screening Activators of CARM1 (pages 827–835)

      Hao Zeng, Dr. Jiacai Wu, Prof. Dr. Mark T. Bedford, Prof. Dr. Gianluca Sbardella, Prof. Dr. F. Michael Hoffmann, Dr. Kun Bi and Prof. Dr. Wei Xu

      Version of Record online: 12 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300029

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      TR-FRET assay monitors CARM1 cellular activity: CARM1 is a unique ERα coactivator that can inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. This work describes the development and optimization of a TR-FRET assay to screen activators of CARM1 so as to further validate its therapeutic potential in breast cancer.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The Structure of Glycerol Trinitrate Reductase NerA from Agrobacterium radiobacter Reveals the Molecular Reason for Nitro- and Ene-Reductase Activity in OYE Homologues (pages 836–845)

      Dr. Gustav Oberdorfer, Dr. Alexandra Binter, Dr. Silvia Wallner, Dr. Katharina Durchschein, Dr. Mélanie Hall, Prof. Kurt Faber, Prof. Peter Macheroux and Prof. Karl Gruber

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Refining reductases: We determined the crystal structure of the OYE-like enzyme NerA from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which shows both ene-reductase and nitro-reductase activity. Structure analysis and spectroscopic studies indicate the presence of two alternate binding modes of the nitro compounds as an explanation of the dual activity of some OYE homologues.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A Label-Free, Quantitative Assay of Amyloid Fibril Growth Based on Intrinsic Fluorescence (pages 846–850)

      Dr. Dorothea Pinotsi, Dr. Alexander K. Buell, Prof. Dr. Christopher M. Dobson, Dr. Gabriele S. Kaminski Schierle and Prof. Dr. Clemens F. Kaminski

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300103

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Kinetic assay of seeded growth: The graph shows the variation in intrinsic fluorescence intensity of amyloid fibrils. Fluorescence increases during the seeded aggregation of α-synuclein seeds with α-synuclein monomeric protein (blue curve) but not when α-synuclein seeds are incubated with β-synuclein monomeric protein (black curve), thus showing that no seeded growth occurred in this case.

    4. Configurational Assignment of Secondary Hydroxyl Groups and Methyl Branches in Polyketide Natural Products through Bioinformatic Analysis of the Ketoreductase Domain (pages 851–861)

      Andreas Kitsche and Prof. Dr. Markus Kalesse

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300063

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) were used to predict the configuration of secondary alcohols and methyl branches of modular polyketides. By calculating the Viterbi scores, it was possible not only to correctly predict unknown configurations but also to assess the fidelity of the discrimination.

    5. Profiling Glycosyltransferase Activities by Tritium Imaging of Glycan Microarrays (pages 862–869)

      Dr. Sonia Serna, Dr. Cornelis H. Hokke, Dr. Martin Weissenborn, Prof. Dr. Sabine Flitsch, Prof. Dr. Manuel Martin-Lomas and Dr. Niels-Christian Reichardt

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300051

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-throughput microarray technology has been combined with ultrasensitive and high-resolution tritium autoradiography to create a new platform for the quantitative detection of glycosyltransferase activity on glycan arrays. In addition, we show full compatibility with the use of fluorescently labeled lectins to help with the stereochemical assignment of newly formed glycoside linkages.

    6. Biocatalytic and Structural Properties of a Highly Engineered Halohydrin Dehalogenase (pages 870–881)

      Marcus Schallmey, Robert J. Floor, Prof. Dr. Bernhard Hauer, Dr. Michael Breuer, Peter A. Jekel, Dr. Hein J. Wijma, Prof. Dr. Bauke W. Dijkstra and Prof. Dr. Dick B. Janssen

      Version of Record online: 12 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300005

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Synergistic mutations: A halohydrin dehalogenase with 37 mutations and improved catalytic properties for statin side chain synthesis has been biochemically characterized. Crystal structures with different ligands in the active site give insight into the way in which individual mutations contribute to enhanced stability and faster cyanolysis of epoxides and illustrate the importance of synergistic mutations in directed evolution.

    7. Opposite Modulation of Cell Migration by Distinct Subregions of Urokinase Connecting Peptide (pages 882–889)

      Dr. Paola Franco, Prof. Alfonso Carotenuto, Dr. Cristina Marcozzi, Dr. Giuseppina Votta, Dr. Ciro Sarno, Dr. Ingram Iaccarino, Dr. Diego Brancaccio, Dr. Anna De Vincenzo, Prof. Ettore Novellino, Prof. Paolo Grieco and Dr. Maria Patrizia Stoppelli

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200774

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One peptide, two signals: This study revealed two adjacent regions in urokinase conveying opposite signalling on cell migration. Secondary structure elements characterise either the inhibitory or the stimulatory peptide groups. This knowledge might aid the design of novel inhibitory peptides or peptidomimetics of pathological cell migration and invasion.

    8. Expansion of Access Tunnels and Active-Site Cavities Influence Activity of Haloalkane Dehalogenases in Organic Cosolvents (pages 890–897)

      Veronika Stepankova, Dr. Morteza Khabiri, Dr. Jan Brezovsky, Antonin Pavelka, Dr. Jan Sykora, Dr. Mariana Amaro, Dr. Babak Minofar, Assoc. Prof. Zbynek Prokop, Prof. Martin Hof, Assoc. Prof. Rudiger Ettrich, Dr. Radka Chaloupkova and Prof. Jiri Damborsky

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201200733

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the pocket: Newly developed algorithms enable calculation of the proportion of active-site pockets occupied by cosolvent molecules. These algorithms can be used to analyse trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations, and thus evaluate the effect of water/organic cosolvent mixtures on enzyme catalytic performance.

  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Masthead
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Book Review
    1. The Centrosome: Cell and Molecular Mechanisms of Functions and Dysfunctions in Disease. Edited by Heide Schatten. (page 898)

      Bodo M. H. Lange

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201300017

      Humana Press, Totowa 2012, XIV+396 pp., hardcover, $ 199.00.—ISBN 978-1-62703-034-2

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION