ChemBioChem

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 22

November 17, 2016

Volume 17, Issue 22

Pages 2101–2205

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: A Fluorescent Probe for Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells with High Differentiation Capability into Neurons (ChemBioChem 22/2016) (page 2101)

      Dr. Beomsue Kim, Dr. Suihan Feng, Dr. Seong-Wook Yun, Dr. Cheryl Leong, Dr. Rudrakanta Satapathy, Si Yan Diana Wan and Prof. Dr. Young-Tae Chang

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600568

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      The cover picture shows a neuron-enriched neurosphere that has arisen from a CDg13bright neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC). Differentiated neurons (red) and astrocytes (white) in the neurosphere were immunostained by using Tuj1 and GFAP antibodies, respectively. Nuclei were stained with Hoechst 33342 (blue). CDg13, a fluorescent substrate of Abcg2 transporter, accumulated in Abcg2low neurogenic NSPCs of mouse embryonic brain cells (a schematic green cell). More information can be found in the communication by Y.-T. Chang et al. on page 2118 in Issue 22, 2016 (DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600490).

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Antibiotic Potency against E. coli Is Enhanced by Channel-Forming Alkyl Lariat Ethers (ChemBioChem 22/2016) (page 2102)

      Dr. Saeedeh Negin, Mohit B. Patel, Michael R. Gokel, Dr. Joseph W. Meisel and Dr. George W. Gokel

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600569

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      The inside cover picture shows the proposed mechanism for our lariat ether′s ability to both enhance antibiotic efficacy and overcome efflux-pump based antibiotic resistance. The pictured chemical structure is an aggregate model of five lariat ether compounds present in the cell membrane. More information can be found in the full paper by G. W. Gokel et al. on page 2153 in Issue 22, 2016 (DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600428).

  2. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Quantum Dot-Based Nanotools for Bioimaging, Diagnostics, and Drug Delivery (pages 2103–2114)

      Regina Bilan, Prof. Dr. Igor Nabiev and Dr. Alyona Sukhanova

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600357

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      Joining the dots: Recent achievements in applications of quantum dots for in vitro and in vivo bioimaging, targeting, and drug delivery are reviewed. The issues of quantum dot toxicity and recent progress in overcoming this problem are also discussed.

  3. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. High-Resolution Snapshots of Proteasome Inhibitors in Action Revise Inhibition Paradigms and Inspire Next-Generation Inhibitor Design (pages 2115–2117)

      Dr. Kimberly Carmony, Dr. Wooin Lee and Dr. Kyung Bo Kim

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600488

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      New high-resolution crystal structures reported by Schrader and colleagues refine our understanding of how peptide epoxyketone anticancer drugs inactivate their target: the human proteasome. These findings provide important clues for the design of next-generation proteasome inhibitor drugs.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. A Fluorescent Probe for Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells with High Differentiation Capability into Neurons (pages 2118–2122)

      Dr. Beomsue Kim, Dr. Suihan Feng, Dr. Seong-Wook Yun, Dr. Cheryl Leong, Dr. Rudrakanta Satapathy, Si Yan Diana Wan and Prof. Dr. Young-Tae Chang

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600490

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      Picking brains: CDg13, a new fluorescent substrate for the Abcg2 transporter, facilitated the isolation of neurogenic neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) from embryonic mouse brain. The high sensitivity and selectivity of CDg13 to Abcg2 make the probe as a very useful tool to measure Abcg2 activity in live cells.

    2. Interleukin-4-Clicked Surfaces Drive M2 Macrophage Polarization (pages 2123–2128)

      Dr. Tessa Lühmann, Valerie Spieler, Dr. Vera Werner, Dr. Marie-Gabrielle Ludwig, Dr. Juliane Fiebig, Prof. Dr. Thomas D. Mueller and Prof. Dr. Dr. Lorenz Meinel

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600480

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      Tissue repair is supported by M2-polarized macrophages. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) muteins were generated by introducing unnatural amino acids into the immune-modulating cytokine for CuAAC- and SPAAC-based site-directed surface decoration. The approach provides a blueprint for the engineering of cytokine-activated surfaces with sustained activity.

    3. Two Opposing d-Amino Acids Give Zigzag Hairpin Epitopes an Additional Kink to Create Antibody-Selective Peptide Antigens (pages 2129–2132)

      Andreas Schrimpf and Prof. Armin Geyer

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600479

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      Conformation determines activity: The zigzag shape of an all-l β-hairpin peptide is kinked by cross-strand correlated pairs of d-amino acids. The unusual epitope conformations were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. These are specific synthetic antigens for antibody discrimination.

    4. Combination of Thiol-Additive-Free Native Chemical Ligation/Desulfurization and Intentional Replacement of Alanine with Cysteine (pages 2133–2136)

      Dr. Shugo Tsuda, Dr. Masayoshi Mochizuki, Dr. Hideki Nishio and Dr. Taku Yoshiya

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600455

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      Multi-Ala-containing peptides were efficiently prepared after desulfurization of multi-Cys-containing intermediate peptides that were synthesized by thiol-additive-free native chemical ligation (NCL). Simultaneously, we found that thioester-equivalent N-acyl-N′-methyl-benzimidazolinone (peptide-MeDbz) can be applied directly as thioester components for thiol-additive-free NCL.

    5. In Vitro Investigation of Crosstalk between Fatty Acid and Polyketide Synthases in the Andrimid Biosynthetic Assembly Line (pages 2137–2142)

      Dr. Fumihiro Ishikawa, Hiroyasu Sugimoto and Prof. Hideaki Kakeya

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600410

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      Functional interactions between fatty acid and polyketide synthases: Crosstalk between fatty acid synthase (FAS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) in the Andrimid (Adm) assembly line involves a malonyl-CoA acyl carrier protein (ACP) transacylase from the FAS complex loading malonate from malonyl-CoA to the AdmA PKS ACP.

    6. Five-Membered Cyclitol Phosphate Formation by a myo-Inositol Phosphate Synthase Orthologue in the Biosynthesis of the Carbocyclic Nucleoside Antibiotic Aristeromycin (pages 2143–2148)

      Prof. Dr. Fumitaka Kudo, Takeshi Tsunoda, Makoto Takashima and Prof. Dr. Tadashi Eguchi

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600348

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      Genome mining of the aristeromycin biosynthetic gene cluster revealed a myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase orthologue Ari2 responsible for the carbocycle formation from d-fructose 6-phosphate. Heterologous expression of the ari gene cluster resulted in aristeromycin production. The Ari2 reaction product was a novel five-membered cyclitol phosphate.

    7. Metabolic Incorporation of Azide Functionality into Cellular RNA (pages 2149–2152)

      Sarah Nainar, Samantha Beasley, Michael Fazio, Miles Kubota, Nan Dai, Ivan R. Corrêa Jr. and Prof. Robert C. Spitale

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600300

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      Azide Functionality, Inc. We explored azidonucleoside incorporation into cellular RNA, revealing selectivity for azidoadenosine analogues and no incorporation of 5-azidouridine. This expansion of the bioorthogonal toolkit for RNA will further investigation into RNA expression and processing and provide a platform for analyzing the growing list of RNA functions beyond protein encoding.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Reviews
    4. Highlights
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Antibiotic Potency against E. coli Is Enhanced by Channel-Forming Alkyl Lariat Ethers (pages 2153–2161)

      Dr. Saeedeh Negin, Mohit B. Patel, Michael R. Gokel, Dr. Joseph W. Meisel and Dr. George W. Gokel

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600428

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Change that channel! Dialkyldiaza lariat ethers, previously thought only to function as ion carriers, were found to form ion-transporting pores and enhance the potency of tetracycline and rifampicin against the Gram-negative pathogen Escherichia coli.

    2. Imidazolyl-Naphthalenediimide-Based Threading Intercalators of DNA (pages 2162–2171)

      Y. V. Suseela, Shubhajit Das, Prof. Swapan K. Pati and Prof. T. Govindaraju

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600478

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      Let it thread! The role of an imidazolyl moiety in threading intercalators of DNA was investigated by employing a series of imidazolyl–naphthalene- diimide conjugates. The biological significance of potent threading intercalators is demonstrated by the inhibition of topoisomerase I activity and cytotoxicity in HeLa cells.

    3. A DNA Circuit for IsomiR Detection (pages 2172–2178)

      Dr. Ashley R. Connolly, Dr. Rena Hirani, Prof. Amanda V. Ellis and Prof. Matt Trau

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600452

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      An oligonucleotide was designed to function as a DNA circuit to detect IsomiRs. The circuit consists of two DNA switches. The first is “activated” by reverse transcription of a microRNA. Nucleotides complementary to the 5′-region of the microRNA promote DNA hairpin formation. This “activates” the second switch, which initiates DNA amplification.

    4. Targeting EphA2-Sam and Its Interactome: Design and Evaluation of Helical Peptides Enriched in Charged Residues (pages 2179–2188)

      Dr. Flavia A. Mercurio, Dr. Daniela Marasco, Dr. Concetta Di Natale, Dr. Luciano Pirone, Dr. Susan Costantini, Dr. Emilia M. Pedone and Dr. Marilisa Leone

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600413

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      Sam domain binders: Several helical peptides enriched in charged residues were designed. Their ability to interact with EphA2-Sam and its binding partner Odin was explored through a variety of techniques (NMR, SPR, and microscale thermophoresis MST). These studies led to the identification of two ligands of the first Sam domain of Odin.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster (pages 2189–2198)

      Anyarat Thanapipatsiri, Dr. Juan Pablo Gomez-Escribano, Dr. Lijiang Song, Maureen J. Bibb, Dr. Mahmoud Al-Bassam, Dr. Govind Chandra, Prof. Arinthip Thamchaipenet, Prof. Gregory L. Challis and Prof. Mervyn J. Bibb

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600396

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      Transcriptional profiling of a bldM developmental mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae revealed the activation of transcription of a cryptic gene cluster encoding an unusual biaryl polyketide (venemycin) and halogenated derivatives. Production of the compounds was also elicited by introducing the gene cluster into the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor combined with constitutive expression of the cluster-situated regulatory gene venR.

    6. Interkingdom Responses to Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signals Regulate Frequency and Rate of Nodulation in Legume–Rhizobia Symbiosis (pages 2199–2205)

      Prof. Andrew G. Palmer, Prof. Arijit Mukherjee, Dr. Danielle M. Stacy, Stephen Lazar, Prof. Jean-Michel Ané and Prof. Helen E. Blackwell

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201600373

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      Negotiating plant–bacteria treaties: Density-dependent phenotypic switching in bacteria, quorum sensing (QS), is instrumental in many pathogenic and mutualistic behaviors. Regulation depends on refined temporal and spatial models of quorums under native conditions. Using naturally occurring and synthetic ligands, we were able to regulate the legume–rhizobia mutualistic symbiosis (nodulation) between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti.

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