3D Arrays for high throughput assay of cell migration and electrotaxis

Authors

  • Sanjun Zhao,

    1. Laboratory of Regenerative Biology, Key Laboratory of Yunnan for Biomass Energy and Biotechnology of Environment, School of Life Sciences, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, China
    2. Institute for Regenerative Cures, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, California, USA
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  • Runchi Gao,

    1. Laboratory of Regenerative Biology, Key Laboratory of Yunnan for Biomass Energy and Biotechnology of Environment, School of Life Sciences, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, China
    2. Institute for Regenerative Cures, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, California, USA
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  • Peter N. Devreotes,

    1. Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
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  • Alex Mogilner,

    1. Departments of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA
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  • Min Zhao

    Corresponding author
    • Institute for Regenerative Cures, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, California, USA
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: 3D arrays for high throughput assay of cell migration and electrotaxis Volume 38, Issue 8, 987, Article first published online: 16 June 2014

Corresponding author: e-mail: minzhao@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

Cell behaviour in 3D environments can be significantly different from those in 2D cultures. With many different 3D matrices being developed and many experimental modalities used to modulate cell behaviour in 3D, it is necessary to develop high throughput techniques to study behaviour in 3D. We report on a 3D array on slide and have adapted this to our electrotaxis chamber, thereby offering a novel approach to quantify cellular responses to electric fields (EFs) in 3D conditions, in different matrices, with different strains of cells, under various field strengths. These developments used Dictyostelium cells to illustrate possible applications and limitations.

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