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IL-8 enhances the angiogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by increasing vascular endothelial growth factor

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Abstract

The beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are mediated partly by the paracrine production of cytoprotective and trophic factors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is released from MSCs as a paracrine trophic factor and contributes to the therapeutic effects of the stem cell by regulating angiogenesis and promoting revascularization in injured tissues. Interleukin-8 (IL-8), an inflammatory chemokine with potent proangiogenic properties, is upregulated in the ischemic brain and has been shown to promote homing of bone marrow-derived cells to injured sites. However, the effect of IL-8 on MSCs paracrine function remains unknown. We found that IL-8 induced VEGF production and phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. Both effects could be blocked by inhibitors (LY294002, PD098059) or siRNA-mediated silencing of Akt and ERK in human bone marrow MSCs (hBM-MSCs). IL-8-induced VEGF production in hBM-MSCs significantly increased tube formation on Matrigel compared with basal secreted VEGF. In a rat stroke model, administration of IL-8-treated hBM-MSCs decreased the infarction volume and increased angiogenesis in the ischemic boundary zone compared with hBM-MSC treatment alone. In conclusion, IL-8 stimulates VEGF production in hBM-MSCs in part via the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signal transduction pathways and that administration of IL-8-treated hBM-MSCs increases angiogenesis after stroke. This approach may be used to optimize MSC-based therapies for numerous diseases including stroke, myocardial ischemia, and spinal cord injury.

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