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Sequential trans-catheter aortic valve implantation and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

Authors

  • Mark Drury-Smith MRCP,

    1. Heart and Lung Centre, New Cross Hospital, Wolverhampton, United Kingdom
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  • Andrew Garnham FRCS,

    1. Heart and Lung Centre, New Cross Hospital, Wolverhampton, United Kingdom
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  • Saib Khogali MD, FRCP

    Corresponding author
    1. Heart and Lung Centre, New Cross Hospital, Wolverhampton, United Kingdom
    • Consultant Cardiologist and, Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer, University of Birmingham, Heart & Lung Centre, New Cross Hospital, Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, Wednesfield, Wolverhampton, WV10 0QP, United Kingdom
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  • Conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

Aortic stenosis in the elderly population is an increasing problem, with many patients being considered too high risk for surgery, and therefore being denied treatment. A percutaneous method of treatment in the form of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is becoming an increasingly attractive option in this group of patients. Although, TAVI has been shown to be successful and improve cardiovascular haemodynamics, assessment of other comorbidities in this susceptible group of patients is essential to ensure good clinical outcomes. The presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in our patient was an example of an important comorbidity which could have a significant impact on the outcome of TAVI, if not managed appropriately. The increased systolic pressure post successful TAVI will result in an increased strain within the AAA with an increased risk of rupture. Therefore, a timely management strategy for the AAA was necessary. Our case is of sequential TAVI followed by Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). The patient underwent uncomplicated TAVI. There was complete abolition of trans-aortic gradient. EVAR was successfully undertaken three weeks post TAVI. The patient made an excellent recovery and remained well at six months follow-up. Our case highlights the importance of a detailed assessment in all patients prior to consideration for TAVI and the importance of having a management strategy for both pathologies tailored to the patient. This case demonstrates the benefits of development of trans-catheter techniques for two different conditions. Future developments including reduction of sheath size reduction and EVAR and TAVI device evolution, may enable simultaneous treatment of aortic stenosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm as a combined percutaneous procedure under local anaesthetic. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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