• Open Access

Succinobucol-eluting stents increase neointimal thickening and peri-strut inflammation in a porcine coronary model

Authors


  • Conflict of interest: PC and BB are employees of Translumina GmbH who manufactured the stents. No other authors have a conflict of interest.

Correspondence to: Jonathan Watt, West of Scotland Regional Heart & Lung Centre, Golden Jubilee National Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. E-mail: jonnywatt@hotmail.com

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of stent-based delivery of succinobucol alone and in combination with rapamycin in a porcine coronary model. Background: Current drugs and polymers used to coat coronary stents remain suboptimal in terms of long term efficacy and safety. Succinobucol is a novel derivative of probucol with improved antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Methods

Polymer-free Yukon stents were coated with 1% succinobucol (SucES), 2% rapamycin (RES), or 1% succinobucol plus 2% rapamycin solutions (SucRES) and compared with a bare metal stent (BMS).

Results

The in vivo release profile of SucES indicated drug release up to 28 days (60% drug released at 7 days); 41 stents (BMS, n = 11; SucES, n =10; RES, n = 10; SucRES, n = 10) were implanted in the coronary arteries of 17 pigs. After 28 days, mean neointimal thickness was 0.31 ± 0.14 mm for BMS, 0.51 ± 0.14 mm for SucES, 0.19 ± 0.11 mm for RES, and 0.36 ± 0.17 mm for SucRES (P < 0.05 for SucES vs. BMS). SucES increased inflammation and fibrin deposition compared with BMS (P < 0.05), whereas RES reduced inflammation compared with BMS (P < 0.05).

Conclusion

In this model, stent-based delivery of 1% succinobucol using a polymer-free stent platform increased neointimal formation and inflammation following coronary stenting. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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