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Early invasive versus selectively invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome: Impact of age

Authors


  • Conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

Background

It is unclear whether the benefits of an early invasive strategy (EIS) in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTEACS) equally apply to younger and older individuals. Elderly patients are generally less likely to undergo EIS when compared with younger patients.

Objectives

We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the benefit of an EIS versus a selectively invasive strategy (SIS) in patients with NSTEACS. We tested the hypothesis that the magnitude of benefit of an EIS over a SIS mainly applies to older individuals.

Methods

We extracted data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified through search methodology filters. The primary outcome of the analysis was the composite of all-cause death and myocardial infarction (MI). Secondary outcomes were death and MI taken alone and re-hospitalization.

Results

Nine trials (n = 9,400 patients) were eligible. The incidence of the composite end-point of MI and all-cause death was 16.0% with the EIS and 18.3% with the SIS (OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.76–0.95). The incidence of MI was 8.4% with the EIS and 10.9% with the SIS (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.66–0.87). Similar results were obtained for rehospitalization (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55–0.90). The incidence of all-cause death did not differ between the two groups. The EIS reduced the composite end-point and re-hospitalization to a greater extent in elderly than in younger patients (P for interaction = 0.044 and <0.0001, respectively). These findings were confirmed in meta-regression analyses.

Conclusions

In patients with NSTEACS, a routine EIS reduces the risk of rehospitalization and the composite end point of recurrent MI and death to a greater extent in elderly than in younger individuals. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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