Does oral care contribute to brain activation?: One case of functional near-infrared spectroscopy study in patients with a persistent disturbance of consciousness

Authors

  • Wataru Fujii,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Dental Surgery, Fujita Health University Nanakuri Sanatorium, Tsu, Mie, Japan
    2. Department of Dental Surgery, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan
    • Correspondence

      Wataru Fujii, Department of Dental Surgery, Fujita Health University Nanakuri Sanatorium, 424-1 Ohtori, Tsu, Mie 514-1295, Japan. Tel: +81-59-252-1555; Fax: +81-59-252-1383; E-mail: wataru@fujita-hu.ac.jp

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  • Daisuke Kanamori,

    1. Department of Dental Surgery, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan
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  • Chisato Nagata,

    1. Department of Dental Surgery, Fujita Health University Nanakuri Sanatorium, Tsu, Mie, Japan
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  • Kiyomi Sakaguchi,

    1. Department of Dental Surgery, Fujita Health University Nanakuri Sanatorium, Tsu, Mie, Japan
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  • Risa Watanabe

    1. Department of Dental Surgery, Fujita Health University Hospital, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan
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Key Clinical Message

We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure cerebral blood flow during oral care in a patient with persistent disturbance of consciousness. We experienced that cerebral blood flow to frontal area increased during oral care, suggesting that oral care may have a potential role in rehabilitation for the brain.

Ancillary