Development of Novel Catalysts for Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Tuning the Product Selectivity

Authors

  • Dr. Qinghong Zhang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and National Engineering Laboratory for Green Chemical Productions of Alcohols, Ethers and Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (P. R. China), Fax: (+86) 592-218-3047
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  • Jincan Kang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and National Engineering Laboratory for Green Chemical Productions of Alcohols, Ethers and Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (P. R. China), Fax: (+86) 592-218-3047
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  • Prof. Dr. Ye Wang

    1. State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and National Engineering Laboratory for Green Chemical Productions of Alcohols, Ethers and Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (P. R. China), Fax: (+86) 592-218-3047
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Abstract

Fischer–Tropsch synthesis is a heterogeneous catalytic process for the production of clean hydrocarbon fuels or chemicals from synthesis gas (CO+H2), which can be derived from non-petroleum feedstocks such as natural gas, coal, or biomass. Fischer–Tropsch synthesis has received renewed interests in recent years because of the global demand for a decreased dependence on petroleum for production of fuels and chemicals. The product distributions with conventional Fischer–Tropsch catalysts usually follow the Anderson–Schulz–Flory distribution and are typically unselective with regards to the formation of hydrocarbons from methane to waxes. Selectivity control is one of the key challenges of research into Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. This Review article summarizes the effects of key factors on catalytic properties, particularly the product selectivity, and highlights recent developments of novel Fischer–Tropsch catalysts and new strategies with an aim at controlling the product selectivity.

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