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Catalyst Development for CO2 Hydrogenation to Fuels

Authors

  • Dr. Uwe Rodemerck,

    Corresponding author
    1. Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse an der Universität Rostock e.V. Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany), Fax: (+49) 381 1281 51310
    • Uwe Rodemerck, Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse an der Universität Rostock e.V. Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany), Fax: (+49) 381 1281 51310

      Manfred Baerns, Fritz-Haber-Institute, Dept. Inorganic Chemistry, Max-Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany), Fax: (+49) 30 8311082

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  • Dr. Dr. Martin Holeňa,

    1. Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse an der Universität Rostock e.V. Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany), Fax: (+49) 381 1281 51310
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  • Dr.-Ing. Edmund Wagner,

    1. General Institute for Applied Nature-adapted Technologies G.I.A.N.T. AG, Baarerstrasse 78, 6301 Zug (Switzerland)
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  • Dr. Quido Smejkal,

    1. EnProCo Berlin GmbH, Volmerstr. 7a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Dr. Axel Barkschat,

    1. Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse an der Universität Rostock e.V. Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany), Fax: (+49) 381 1281 51310
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  • Prof. em. Dr. Manfred Baerns

    Corresponding author
    1. Fritz-Haber-Institute, Dept. Inorganic Chemistry, Max-Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany), Fax: (+49) 30 8311082
    • Uwe Rodemerck, Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse an der Universität Rostock e.V. Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany), Fax: (+49) 381 1281 51310

      Manfred Baerns, Fritz-Haber-Institute, Dept. Inorganic Chemistry, Max-Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany), Fax: (+49) 30 8311082

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Abstract

New active and selective catalyst compositions for the hydrogenation of CO2 to mainly fuel-type higher hydrocarbons were developed by application of an evolutionary strategy. It was shown that Fe and K supported on TiO2 and modified by Cu plus other modifiers resulted in highest selectivity for C5–C15 hydrocarbons at high degrees of CO2 conversion. Co containing catalysts were less suited since they produced methane and light hydrocarbons with high selectivities. A detailed study of reaction conditions showed that selected catalyst compositions were able to reach high CO2 conversion with still low selectivities to methane at higher reaction temperatures and a higher H2/CO2 ratio.

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