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The First Continuous Flow Hydrogenation of Amides to Amines

Authors

  • Dr. Jacorien Coetzee,

    1. EastChem, School of Chemistry, North Haugh, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9ST, Scotland (United Kingdom), Fax: (+44) 0-1334-463808
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  • Dr. Haresh G. Manyar,

    1. CenTACat, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, Stranmillis Road, Belfast, BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)
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  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Hardacre,

    1. CenTACat, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, Stranmillis Road, Belfast, BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)
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  • Prof. Dr. David J. Cole-Hamilton

    Corresponding author
    1. EastChem, School of Chemistry, North Haugh, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9ST, Scotland (United Kingdom), Fax: (+44) 0-1334-463808
    • EastChem, School of Chemistry, North Haugh, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9ST, Scotland (United Kingdom), Fax: (+44) 0-1334-463808
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Abstract

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Hydrogen goes with the flow: Conversion of amides into amines is usually achieved with stoichiometric amounts of metal hydrides, which generate large amounts of waste. Catalytic hydrogenation represents an environmentally benign alternative for this conversion, whereas flow catalysis allows catalyst separation and high throughput. Here, we combine amide hydrogenation and flow catalysis for the first time.

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