Structure–Activity Relationships of Nickel–Hexaaluminates in Reforming Reactions Part I: Controlling Nickel Nanoparticle Growth and Phase Formation

Authors

  • Thomas Roussière,

    1. R&D Solutions hte AG, the high throughput experimentation company Kurpfalzring 104, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany), Fax: (+49) 06221-749-7137
    2. Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engesserstr. 20, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany), Fax: (+49) 07216-084-4805
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  • Korwin M. Schelkle,

    1. Organisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 270, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany), Fax: (+49) 06221-544-885
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  • Sven Titlbach,

    1. R&D Solutions hte AG, the high throughput experimentation company Kurpfalzring 104, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany), Fax: (+49) 06221-749-7137
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  • Guido Wasserschaff,

    1. R&D Solutions hte AG, the high throughput experimentation company Kurpfalzring 104, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany), Fax: (+49) 06221-749-7137
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  • Dr. Andrian Milanov,

    1. GCC/PG, BASF SE, Carl-Bosch-Straße 38, 67038 Ludwigshafen (Germany), Fax: (+49) 0621-606-679-354
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  • Dr. Gerhard Cox,

    1. GMC/I, BASF SE, Carl-Bosch-Straße 38, 67038 Ludwigshafen (Germany), Fax: (+49) 0621-609-7262
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  • Dr. Ekkehard Schwab,

    1. GCC/PG, BASF SE, Carl-Bosch-Straße 38, 67038 Ludwigshafen (Germany), Fax: (+49) 0621-606-679-354
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  • Prof. Dr. Olaf Deutschmann,

    1. Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engesserstr. 20, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany), Fax: (+49) 07216-084-4805
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  • Linus Schulz,

    1. Catalysis Research Center, Department Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr.4, 85748 Garching (Germany), Fax: (+49) 089-28-913-544
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  • Dr. Andreas Jentys,

    1. Catalysis Research Center, Department Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr.4, 85748 Garching (Germany), Fax: (+49) 089-28-913-544
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  • Prof. Dr. Johannes Lercher,

    1. Catalysis Research Center, Department Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr.4, 85748 Garching (Germany), Fax: (+49) 089-28-913-544
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  • Dr. Stephan A. Schunk

    Corresponding author
    1. R&D Solutions hte AG, the high throughput experimentation company Kurpfalzring 104, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany), Fax: (+49) 06221-749-7137
    • R&D Solutions hte AG, the high throughput experimentation company Kurpfalzring 104, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany), Fax: (+49) 06221-749-7137===

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Abstract

The controlled synthesis of hexaaluminates ANiyAl12−yO19−δ (A=Ba, La, Sr, and y=0.25, 0.5, 1) is reported by a freeze drying route. This route allows the use of moderate temperatures of approximately 1200 °C to obtain hexaaluminates of high phase purity (>80 wt %) as well as high specific surface areas (10–30 m2 g−1). Under reducing conditions at elevated temperatures, nickel expulsion from the hexaaluminate framework can be observed. High stability of the crystalline phase is observed even if all substitution cations leave the hexaaluminate framework. The moderate calcination temperature of 1200 °C facilitates the reducibility of the Ni–hexaaluminates compared to Ni–hexaaluminates calcined at 1600 °C. SEM and TEM imaging revealed that Ni–hexaaluminates with low Ni loading (y=0.25) and calcined at moderate temperature (1200 °C) lead under reducing atmosphere to the formation of strong textural growth and highly disperse and highly textured Ni0 nanoparticles. Nanoparticle growth is associated to surface defect sites occurring on the hexaaluminate platelets.

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