Cover Picture: Optimum Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Elemental Mapping for Advanced Catalytic Materials (ChemCatChem 9/2013)

Authors

  • Dr. Bingsen Zhang,

    1. Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China), Fax: (+86) 24-83970019
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  • Dr. Wei Zhang,

    1. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Dr. Lidong Shao,

    1. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)
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  • Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su

    Corresponding author
    1. Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China), Fax: (+86) 24-83970019
    2. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)
    • Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China), Fax: (+86) 24-83970019
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Abstract

original image

Cartography for the catalysis researcher The cover picture shows that the observation of individual elements in advanced catalytic materials can be achieved by determining optimum conditions for obtaining an accurate STEM-EDX elemental map. In their Communication on p. 2586 ff., D. S. Su et al. reveal that a suitable combination of dwell time and beam intensity is crucial in pinpointing elemental distribution by using STEM-EDX mapping. Importantly, trace amounts of catalytic species can be observed towards the analytical limit to determine information, such as elemental composition, size, and morphology, as well as, in particular, the possible dynamic changes in nanoparticles after catalytic reactions.

Cartoon 1.

Ancillary